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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Only 5% Of Children’s Yoghurts Contain ‘healthy’ Sugar Levels

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Only one in 20 children’s yogurts has healthy sugar levels, activists warned.

And the worst offender has five and a half teaspoons of sugar per pot – as much as 16 malt milk biscuits or five chocolate digestifs.

Healthy eating experts say claims about calcium and vitamin D levels in sugary yogurts “distract parents from scrutinizing nutritional information.”

They are now calling on the government to impose stricter restrictions to prevent parents from being “misled” into buying the items for their children.

And they want a “total ban” on child-friendly packaging for yogurts with medium or high sugar content.

The Action for Sugar campaign group examined the nutritional information of 100 of the country’s most popular children’s yogurts.

They were aimed at teenagers through bright packaging and cartoon characters, the researchers said.

Nutritionists warn against giving children sugary yogurts that can make them “addicted to the sweet things for life”.

Every third child leaves elementary school overweight, and obesity diseases cost the NHS around £ 6 billion a year.

The NHS recommends children ages four to six not eat more than 19 grams of sugar per day. And people between the ages of seven and ten shouldn’t consume more than 24 g per day, the guidelines say.

The added sugars include the syrups and fruit concentrates that are stacked in popular yogurts.

The charity based at Queen Mary University of London found Nestlé’s Rolo Mix-in Toffee-Yogurt to be the worst culprit. It contained 20.6 grams of sugar per 100 grams.

For comparison: A McVitie’s Chocolate Digestive biscuit contains around 4.8 g of sugar.

Nestlé’s Smarties vanilla yoghurt (13.8 g), two Yoplait fruit yoghurts (13.3 g and 13.2 g) and Lidl’s Milbona raspberry yoghurt (12.5 g) rounded off the top 5.

Popular kid-friendly brands like Frubes and Munch Bunch were also among those high in sugar.

Meanwhile, only five options had healthy sugar levels – defined as less than 5g per 100g.

This included two petits filous with no added sugar (4.9 g and 4.8 g) and two nush almond milk yogurts (5 g and 2.2 g).

Is your plant-based grill REALLY healthier than one made with meat? Vegetarian and vegan alternatives to sausages, burgers and kebabs can contain up to 10 TIMES more sugar

Vegetarian and vegan equivalents of the country’s most popular BBQ foods can contain up to 10 times more sugar, MailOnline announced this week.

And the worst offensive meat-free alternatives – that are Often referred to as healthier than conventional staple foods – are up to six times saltier.

Nutrition experts warned that meat substitutes shouldn’t automatically be perceived as “healthier” just because they don’t contain red meat.

However, they admitted that higher levels of sugar and salt didn’t necessarily mean worse, as many vegetarian options have fewer calories, less fat, and more fiber.

Our analysis looked at the nutritional benefits of a selection of BBQ favorites, including sausages and burgers, as well as kebabs, bacon, and meatballs.

There are 2g of sugar in every 100g of Wicked Kitchen Vegetarian Chili and Lime Kebabs, compared to just 0.2g for the same amount of Morrison’s Lamb Kebabs.

And Two Birds Eye’s meatless sausages contain 2.2g of sugar, compared to just 0.5g in two pork sausages sold at Tesco.

In the case of burgers, Sainsbury’s and Waitrose’s meat dishes contain less than 0.5 g of sugar.

But the vegetarian alternatives by Linda McCartney (0.9g), Heck (1.4g) and Morrisons (2.1g) have up to four times as much sugar.

Meanwhile, a vegetable steak from Vivera – sold in supermarkets like Sainsbury’s and Asda – has 2.4g of sugar per 200g, while a ribeye steak sold at Sainsbury’s has less than 0.5g.

Two slices of THIS vegetable bacon (0.3 g) contain three times more sugar compared to Tesco’s pork option (0.1 g).

And Linda McCartney’s vegetarian meatballs (2.3g) are up to five times more than Asda beefballs (less than 0.5g).

Professor Gunter Kuhnle, an expert in nutrition and food science at the University of Reading, told MailOnline, “I think one of the difficulties with many meat substitutes is that it is difficult to mimic the taste of the original product.

“I suppose this is one reason for introducing more salt or sugar.”

He said that a vegetarian product, which has ten times more sugar than a meat product, “doesn’t matter too much to most people” from a health perspective if the calories in the foods are similar.

“Higher salt levels could affect your risk of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease – but only if it’s really high and someone can easily get over the daily recommendation,” he said.

Professor Kuhnle added: “In general, I think there is a problem with perceiving food as“ healthier ”just because it does not contain meat.

“Meat is neither healthy nor unhealthy. It’s just one type of food that can provide energy and some essential nutrients (especially vitamin B12 and iron), but more importantly, it’s enjoyed by many people.

“As with most other foods, overeating can be detrimental to health – meat increases the risk of cancer and potentially heart disease.”

A mango and passion fruit yogurt from Coconut Collaborative also had a healthy sugar content (4.6 g), the analysis found.

Overall, 63 percent of yogurt pots contained a third or more of the maximum daily intake of added sugar for a four to six year old.

In addition, yogurt packaging often contains calcium, vitamin D and high protein claims, Action for Sugar said.

This creates a “skewed” health court, “suggesting the products are completely healthy and contain only sugars from natural sources like lactose from milk, the charity said.

The researchers found that the average fat content in three-quarters of the yogurt was healthy.

But two-thirds had a higher percentage of saturated fats, which contribute to poor heart health.

Dr. Kawther Hashem, nutritionist and campaign leader at Action on Sugar, said companies are trying to prevent parents’ eyes from seeing the “significant amount” of sugar on their nutrition labels by using “health-sounding claims and cartoons.”

She said, “Parents can easily be misled by walking down the yogurt aisle in the supermarket.

“Since only 5 percent of yogurts with kid-friendly packaging would have a green label as ‘healthy’ for sugar, food companies must make every effort to reduce the sugar in these products, especially those that are specifically targeted at children.”

Katharine Jenner, Campaign Manager at Action on Sugar, said, “Smart marketing techniques like advertising, promotions, and packaging are powerful tools to get kids excited about cute things from an early age and life.

“While the government’s obesity strategy is taking bold steps to tackle unhealthy advertisements and promotions, they must now ensure that food companies only use cartoons and health statements on their healthier products so parents can see more of what is good for their children is.”

Professor Graham MacGregor CBE, Chairman of Action on Sugar and an expert in cardiovascular medicine at Queen Mary’s, said: “It is imperative that food companies act more responsibly and commit to reformulating sugar, salt and calorie restriction rather than making us unhealthy To impose products that contain “child-friendly packaging with misleading nutrition and health claims.”

Charlotte Stirling-Reed, a registered nutritionist for children, told MailOnline that the numbers were a shame and disappointing, but “not really shocking”.

She said, “Many brands are making efforts to reduce the sugar in their foods, and the government has asked brands that supply food to young children to do the same.

“It would be good if the sugar content in children’s yoghurts were greatly reduced across the board.

“Ideally, we would like to see foods for babies and toddlers that fit into the“ low-sugar ”category.

“When I advise parents, I generally recommend offering babies and toddlers natural yoghurt, if possible with no added sugar, in order to keep the free sugar content as low as possible.

“Even when sugary yoghurts are introduced, children can often prefer them and reject natural yoghurts. Therefore, it is best to concentrate on simple types for as long as possible.”

Julia Wolman, a registered nutritionist specializing in healthy eating for families and children, told MailOnline, “It’s quite shocking, if not surprising, that so many children’s yogurts still have added sugar.

“Yogurt is one of those products that always contains some sugar, especially milk yogurt, because of the lactose, a natural sugar found in milk.

“But when artificial sugar is added, the yoghurts taste super sweet and delicious – coupled with the health messages on the pack, it’s easy to see why parents would keep buying them.

“The problem is that once children get used to liking sweet foods, that taste bias can stay with them throughout their lives as a child, teenager, and adult.

“While foods rich in sugar are okay in moderation, overeating them can lead to excess weight gain over time, which can increase the risk of diet-related illnesses.

“Ideally, we would like children to get used to the taste of low-sugar yogurt at an early age.

“A snack or dessert made from natural yoghurt with pureed, pureed or chopped fruits would be the gold standard in my opinion.

“It would be great if more brands replicated this type of no-sugar recipe alongside their cartoon characters and health claims on the box.”

What should a balanced diet look like?

Meals should be based on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally whole grains, according to the NHS

• Eat at least 5 servings of different types of fruit and vegetables every day. Count all fresh, frozen, dried, and canned fruits and vegetables

• Basic meals based on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally whole grains

• 30 grams of fiber per day: This corresponds to the consumption of everything: 5 servings of fruit and vegetables, 2 wholemeal cereal biscuits, 2 thick slices of wholemeal bread and a large baked potato with the skin on

• Have some dairy products or milk alternatives (such as soy drinks) and choose low-fat and low-sugar options

• Eat beans, legumes, fish, eggs, meat, and other proteins (including 2 servings of fish per week, one of which should be oily)

• Choose unsaturated oils and spreads and consume them in small amounts

• Drink 6-8 cups / glasses of water daily

• Adults should consume less than 6 g salt and 20 g saturated fat for women or 30 g for men per day

Source: NHS Eatwell Guide

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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

These Popped Sorghum Snacks Will Satisfy Your Crunchy Cravings

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In the category of crispy snacks, popcorn has the edge over its chip and cracker competition: with a few spices, it can take on any taste profile, makes your entire kitchen smell of melted butter and can be eaten in large portions, without your stomach feeling like it has exceeded its maximum capacity. Still, munching has a big trap: it leaves sharp pits in your gums and teeth, forcing you to floss a few minutes after each snack.

The equally delicious solution to the dental problem: Swap your popcorn for popped sorghum. The age-old whole grain has a barely visible shell that won’t slip between your teeth when chewed, and it offers the same light and fluffy, but extremely crunchy texture as the OG pop snack. And despite its tiny size (seriously, the grain is about 3 millimeters in diameter), sorghum is full of nutrients; half a cup of the unroasted, naturally gluten-free grain contains 6.5 grams of fiber, 51 percent of the recommended dietary allowance for magnesium (a mineral that regulates muscle and nerve function) and 85 percent of the recommended daily allowance for manganese (a mineral that helps Energy and protect your cells from damage), according to the United States Department of Agriculture.

How to Pop Sorghum

To gather these nutrients and satisfy your cravings for a crispy nibble, you have several options. If you’d rather cook your popped sorghum from scratch, simply pour grains of sorghum (Buy It, $ 13, amazon.com) into a hot stainless steel saucepan, cover with a tight-fitting lid, and cook over medium heat under constant pressure Shake the pot. As soon as you hear about two-thirds of the grains popping (you should listen carefully), take the stove off the stove, pour out the cracked grains, and repeat the process with the uncooked ones until they are all cracked and ready to eat. After Bob’s Red Mill. (Related: The Puffed and Popped Food Trend Is A Healthier Way To Eat Snacks)

The story goes on

Try pre-made sorghum snacks

However, for a chaotic and stress-free snacking experience, stock up on one (or all) of these popped-up sorghum snacks. Whether you prefer salty or sweet, bite-sized or in chip form, there is a nibble that will satisfy your stomach and taste buds.

Poplettes Poplette Sorghum Snacks

When you have a firm belief that smartfood is the GOAT in the popcorn department, turn to Poplettes. The brand’s white cheddar sorghum snack has the same flavor as the OG munchie, but each bite is roughly one-sixth the size (sweet!). Those with more adventurous palettes will enjoy the Bollywood Masala variety, which contains bold spices like dried mango powder, red chilli powder, and ground turmeric, or the Mediterranean Magic variety, made with sumac, toasted sesame seeds, thyme, and garlic powder.

Poplettes Poplette Sorghum Snacks

Ka-Pop! Pounded chips

These popped sorghum munchies are made for snackers who are allergic to virtually anything under the sun. With sorghum flour and puffed sorghum kernels, Ka-Pop! Popped Chips are vegan certified and free from GMOs, gluten and the 12 most common allergens. And while they look slightly like a styrofoam-like rice cake, reviewers say the chips – which come in five flavors including non-dairy cheddar, salt and vinegar, and red and green sriracha – are far from boring. “[They] taste a million times better than all popcorn snacks or rice cake snacks I’ve ever eaten, “wrote one buyer. (ICYMI, pasta chips are one thing – that’s how you make them.)

Ka-Pop!  Pounded chips

Ka-Pop! Pounded chips

Chasin ‘Dreams Farm Popped Sorghum Snacks

If you need a sweet treat at 2pm, grab a bag of these cracked sorghum snacks from Chasin ‘Dreams Farm. Founded by women, run by women, the brand offers three types of popped sorghum, including a kettle corn flavor that perfects the balance between salty and sweetness, a cinnamon flavor that is reminiscent of cinnamon buns, and a cocoa flavor that tastes of grains that have actually been in dipped in hot chocolate. But these nibbles are not just for eating; The company recommends sprinkling a few pieces on a scoop of ice cream, mixing them in trail mix or granola, or using them as an edible cake topper. There are no wrong answers here.

Chasin 'Dreams Farm Popped Sorghum Snacks

Chasin ‘Dreams Farm Popped Sorghum Snacks

Nature Nate’s Popped Sorghum

Made exclusively from organic sorghum, avocado oil and sea salt, Nature Nate’s Popped Sorghum snacks are as simple as possible. The nibbles are free from the 12 most common allergens, GMOs, preservatives, additives and natural flavors. Despite the short and sweet list of ingredients, reviewers are clearly obsessed with calling it “a dream come true”. “I literally can’t get enough of this stuff,” said one shopper. “This is the best thing since sliced ​​bread, no kidding. I probably eat at least one bag a week.”

Nature Nate's Popped Sorghum

Nature Nate’s Popped Sorghum

Pop IQ Air Popped Sorghum

With flavors like cheddar, cauldron cooked, and salt and pepper, this popped sorghum could easily be mistaken for the popcorn you’d find in giant snack tins during the holidays. Aside from the simple variety (with one ingredient: sorghum), the snack packs are made from three to five ingredients, including a base of sorghum and sunflower oil or extra virgin olive oil. To make sure you get only the largest chunks of the tiny grain, the company sifts its pops three times, not once or twice. By filtering out crumb-sized pieces that are difficult to eat, your snacking experience will certainly require less cleaning. (Related: 11 Natural Snacks You Will Want To Stock Up On)

Pop IQ Air Popped Sorghum

Pop IQ Air Popped Sorghum

Pop Bitties Ancient Grain Chip

These popped sorghum slices are coated with a sweet-hot-hot-smoky spice mixture and a dead ring for potato chips with BBQ flavor – only they are air-popped instead of deep-fried and are also made with quinoa, chia seeds and. made brown rice. The snack is project-verified, gluten-free, vegan-certified and, according to reviewers, “light as pop-chips, but has the crispness of Stacy”.[‘s] Pita Chips. “Eat them as is or dip them in your favorite dip to balance the heat.

Pop Bitties Ancient Grain Chip

Pop Bitties Ancient Grain Chip

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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

10 Foods That Weaken Your Immune System

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We often hear about foods that can boost our immune systems, but did you know that there are dietary choices that can actually weaken your body’s ability to fight off infection? Studies show that highly processed foods and those full of empty calories with no nutrients can be harmful to your health.

Our immune systems exist to protect us from bacteria and other microbes like viruses and parasites, and with a healthy diet you have a better chance of thwarting these diseases and pathogens. A balanced diet contains an abundance of vitamins and minerals in addition to the calories we need to survive.

So we know what helps us, but what hurts us?

1. Sugary foods

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When we think of sugary foods, we think of baked goods, candy, chocolate, and other processed sweets. But dried or canned fruits or juices also contain a lot of added sugar, which can upset your system. The microbiome that lives in our gut keeps harmful bacteria at bay, but the glucose and fructose in sweetened foods feed these unhealthy microbes and make it difficult to fight infections. In addition, sugar creates a craving for more sugar as the yeast and other sugar-loving microbes in your body get used to the added sugar in your body.

Additionally, adding too much sugar to your diet can raise your blood sugar, which increases inflammatory proteins – especially in diabetics, whose blood sugar stays high for longer. High sugar levels could also inhibit immune cells that protect the body from infection.

People on a high-sugar diet can also be more prone to autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

2. Salty foods

The food tastes much better with salt. It brings out the natural taste and spices up boring dishes. But it’s bad for you It can stop the normal functioning of immune functions, alter your gut bacteria, and increase your risk of autoimmune diseases. Preliminary research shows that the rate of autoimmune diseases of the western world. It can also make existing autoimmune diseases like colitis, Crohn’s disease, and lupus worse. A small study from 2016 showed that men on a high-salt diet had higher levels of monocytes and inflammatory markers, indicating an excessive immune response.

3. Processed meat

It’s time to give up hot dogs and sausages – eating no processed meat is no longer just for pregnant women. This meat has been linked to several diseases, including colon cancer.

This meat is high in saturated fat and has been shown to contribute to immune system dysfunction and inflammation in some people.

The meat also has advanced glycation end products, which are harmful compounds that form when fat and protein mix with sugar in the blood. Most AGEs come from the food we eat and when we have too much of them we cannot regulate them and they cause oxidative stress and inflammation. Fried bacon, hot dogs, fried chicken legs, and steak are high in AGE.

4. Fast food

Burger and fries

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Everyone knows that fast food is not good for you, but sometimes the convenience and deliciousness outweigh these facts. However, fast food is not only bad for your weight, it can also damage your immune system. It’s bad for your gut biome and can increase inflammation. Not only does it contain much of the salt we just talked about, it also contains chemicals, sometimes from plastic or styrofoam packaging, that disrupt human hormone production, weaken immune responses, and even cause dysfunction.

5. Food with additives

The more processed a food is, the more additives it contains – to improve texture, taste, preservation, and the like. These additives, especially emulsifiers and carrageenan, can cause dysregulation of the immune system by changing intestinal bacteria and increasing inflammation. Studies have linked these additives to immune dysfunction in rodents. Which foods are heavily processed? In addition to meat and bacon for lunch, canned soups, canned vegetables, frozen meals, snacks and everything else with a long shelf life.

6. Certain fatty foods

Onion rings on plate

Michael Rheault / Moment / Getty Images

There are some fats that are good for us, but saturated fats are bad for the immune system. They can activate inflammatory pathways that inhibit the immune response and they suppress the function of white blood cells, which can increase the risk of infection. Studies in rodents have shown that a high-fat diet can even damage the lining of the intestines, increasing the susceptibility to disease.

The western diet usually contains a lot of omega-6 fatty acids and far fewer omega-3 fatty acids. The omega-6 fats have been shown to promote inflammatory proteins that weaken our immune system. Studies also show that omega-6 fats may increase your risk of asthma and allergic rhinitis.

7. Artificially sweetened foods

It’s not just sugar that can damage your immune system. The sweeteners we use when trying to avoid sugar can be just as harmful, if not more. They are linked to altered gut bacteria, more inflammation, and a slower immune response. Sucralose and saccharin, in particular, can cause an imbalance in the intestinal biome. It could even fuel the progression of autoimmune diseases.

8. Fried food

Fried foods compete with fast foods and processed meats for AGE levels. Remember, these end products increase the risk of cell damage and inflammation. They also deprive your body of antioxidant mechanisms, disrupt intestinal bacteria and lead to cell dysfunction. All of this could lead to an increased risk of certain types of cancer, heart disease, and even malaria. As much as we’d like to sit back and enjoy fried delicacies, forego french fries, potato chips, fried chicken, bacon, and fish and chips for a healthier response to germ control.

9. Caffeine and alcohol

Beer on a table on a terrace

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Caffeine by itself is not bad for your immune system, but lack of sleep does, and consuming caffeine just before bed can wake you up in the early hours of the morning. We’re not just talking about coffee. Certain teas, chocolate, even protein bars can contain the stuff.

Alcohol suppresses the immune response by reducing the number of cells that fight infection. This makes you more prone to sepsis, poor wound health, pneumonia, and pneumonia.

If you drink alcohol, limit yourself to one drink a night for best results. Consider replacing the drinks with fruit-infused water or teas (without caffeine).

10. Refined carbohydrates

Not all carbohydrates are bad for you; they give you a long-term energy boost, especially the whole grains. But refined carbohydrates like white bread, pasta, bleached flour, and of course sugar can cause an imbalance in gut bacteria that weakens your immune system. They are also highly glycemic foods that raise blood sugar and insulin levels, which can cause free radicals and inflammatory proteins to migrate around the body.

Bring away

It’s not just diet that affects our immune system. Other factors include age (the older we are, the less efficient our organs become at producing immune cells), the environment (if you are a smoker or live in an area with increased air pollution), weight (heavier people have more problems with chronic inflammation, stressing the immune system), chronic physical or mental illnesses such as autoimmune diseases or prolonged stress and lack of sleep.

For real immune health, we must lead balanced lives with careful choices about diet, exercise, and self-care.

Darlena Cunha is a freelance writer and professor at the University of Florida with degrees in communications and ecology.

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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Ugly Side Effects of the American Diet, Say Dietitians

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You may not know the term, but you probably know the concept of the Standard American Diet (SAD). Imagine all of the typical “American” foods and put them all together – burgers, french fries, pizza, soda, sugary cereals, packaged and processed foods, ice cream, the list goes on. While occasional consumption of these types of foods is fine for an overall healthy, balanced diet, regular consumption can have some ugly side effects on your body’s health.

According to a report entitled “Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols” The Standard American Diet includes a diet high in calories, saturated fats, trans fats, added sugars, and sodium. It includes a very low intake of essential nutrients for the body such as fiber, calcium, potassium and vitamin D.

The main benefit of the Standard American Diet is that it lacks fruits and vegetables, which are the best way to include a wide variety of nutrients in your diet.

“A 2010 report from the National Cancer Institute found that nearly the entire US population was eating a diet that was not as recommended,” said Theresa Gentile, MS, RDN, CDN, owner of Full Plate Nutrition. Gentile also points out from the American Cancer Society that about 18% of cancer cases are due to poor diet and sedentary lifestyle.

Developing a serious chronic illness like cancer isn’t the only ugly side effect of consuming the Standard American Diet regularly, which is why it is considered the No. 1 worst diet for Americans.

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“The SAD is the quintessentially American diet that emphasizes red meat, processed foods, refined grains, sugary foods including sodas, with low consumption of fresh fruits, vegetables, fish, whole grains, beans, and legumes,” said Lisa R. Young, PhD , RDN, author of Endlich Full, Endlich Slim and a member of our panel of medical experts. “It’s low in fiber, antioxidants, and high in calories, saturated fat, sugar, and salt.”

Because of the types of foods included (or absent) from the SAD, weight gain can easily become a side effect of consuming such foods on a regular basis.

“It contributed to the high rates of obesity and overweight in the United States (nearly 75% of the population are overweight or obese),” says Young. “It has also led to chronic diet-related diseases such as heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and certain cancers.”

TIED TOGETHER: Get even more healthy tips straight to your inbox by signing up for our newsletter.

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“Most Americans don’t get enough fiber, which is needed for healthy digestion,” says Jinan Banna, PhD, RD. “The SAD is low in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and other such foods. This is just one of the digestive problems that can arise.”

The dietary guidelines for Americans recommend adults consume between 25 and 38 grams of fiber per day, but reports show that Americans only consume an average of 10 to 15 grams per day. A lack of fiber can cause problems with the digestive tract as well as the colon.

“Fiber is essential for heart health as soluble fiber (found in oatmeal and foods made from oatmeal, almonds and seeds, fruits you eat the skin in, etc.) is MS, RD, CSSD, LD, author of The Sports Nutrition Playbook and member our medical expert panel. “Fiber also plays a role as a prebiotic for gut health by nourishing the good gut bacteria and helping push things through your system to improve regularity.”

Here are the dangerous signs that you are not eating enough fiber.

Burger and friesShutterstock

The types of foods typically consumed in the SAD are foods linked to chronic inflammation which, according to Balance One Supplements’ Trista Best, MPH, RD, LD, can have devastating effects on physical, mental, and emotional health .

“Low-level chronic inflammation causes oxidative stress in the body, which leads to many of the chronic diseases common in Western nations,” Best says.Foods known to be flammable include gluten, refined carbohydrates, and sugars, and in general all processed foods from refined or fortified sources – all of which are the basis of SAD. form. “

“These foods are flammable because the body has a hard time breaking them down through natural meals like enzymes and good gut bacteria,” continues Best. “This leads to an inflammatory response in the body’s immune system, which is usually a natural and deliberate response, but in some cases an overreaction to otherwise harmless foods.”

Best points out that inflammation can lead to the development of chronic diseases such as heart disease, obesity, and diabetes.

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“With popular foods like hamburgers, deli, and fried foods, the Standard American Diet contains excessive amounts of saturated fat and sodium,” said Mackenzie Burgess, RDN and recipe developer at Cheerful Choices. “This can be problematic as too much saturated fat has been found to increase blood cholesterol, which can increase the risk of heart disease. Too much sodium can also be a problem as it is linked to high blood pressure, which is another risk factor for the heart is. ” Illness.”

Burgess recommends looking for ways to reduce the saturated fat and sodium in your diet with small swaps. Focusing on healthy sources of fat like fish, avocados, and nuts can promote heart health, and buying low-sodium items from the grocery store (soups, sauces, unprocessed meat, to name a few).

crispsShutterstock

While chronic inflammation and too much saturated fat or sodium play a big role in causing chronic illness, simply overdosing on calories can also put you at increased risk.

Shannon Henry, RD of the EZCare Clinic points out four different diseases that can develop from a high calorie diet – either from eating high calorie foods or simply from consuming too many foods or beverages in general. These include Type 2 diabetes, stroke, coronary artery disease, and kidney and gallbladder defects.

“Above all, our passion for fast food is sad,” says Henry. “For example, although the federal government recommends consuming at least two to five cups of fruits and vegetables a day, surveys show that the average American only eats three servings a day, and 42% say we eat less than two servings.”

French friesShutterstock

Many Americans suffer from the concept of overfed calories but undernourished of valuable and essential nutrients“says Amy Goodson.” The calories they consume are mostly from saturated fat and added sugars, while they consume very little fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which provide vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants and more. “

These types of foods are high in vitamins and minerals that are essential for your body’s health and usually add the “color” to your meals.

The typical American diet often lacks colorful fruits, vegetables and other whole foods“Says Burgess. “This means that most Americans miss out on the myriad benefits of fruits and vegetables, such as their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. In addition, a diet with few colored fruits and vegetables can contain insufficient amounts of important nutrients such as potassium, fiber, folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin C. “

Burgess recommends finding simple ways to add fruits and vegetables to your meals, such as: B. Berries with yoghurt, peppers with pasta or leafy vegetables in your lunch wraps. Plus, these 15 best frozen fruits and vegetables are easy to use.

Club sandwichShutterstock

“Following SAD can lead to poor bone health, as these foods are typically low in bone building nutrients like calcium, vitamin K, and vitamin D,” says Sarah Schlichter, MPH, RDN.

“In addition, a diet low in whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables can influence the metabolism and digestion,” continues Schlichter. “Foods high in fiber can help improve gut health and digestion, while the use of highly processed foods reduces the diversity of bacteria in the gut microbiome, which also affects mood and overall health.”

SundaeShutterstock

Changing your gut microbiome isn’t the only reason your energy levels feel depleted after SAD.

“Coast-to-coast Americans skip meals, eat large amounts of carbohydrates with little quality protein, stock up on sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, and these habits can prepare you for spikes and drops in blood sugar,” says Goodson.

Because of this type of diet, Goodson advises that your blood sugar levels will go up and down like a “roller coaster” throughout the day, which can negatively affect your energy levels.

“The way to fight this is to have balanced meals with high fiber carbohydrates and proteins every few hours,” she says.

Buddha bowlsShutterstock

“The ACS recommends at least 2 1/2 to 3 cups of vegetables and 1 1/2 to 2 cups of fruit daily for cancer prevention, and the USDA recommends 5 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables per day,” says Gentile. “This goal can easily be achieved by adding fruit or vegetables to every meal and including more vegetable-based meals in your rotation, which can lower your risk of cancer.”

For even more healthy eating tips, read these next:

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