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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Do you need to eat like an Olympian?

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At the beginning of the Olympic Games, fans can marvel at the skill, training and dedication of our athletes to do their best. But an invisible – yet important – part of their success is their diet.

“It is important for athletes to focus on optimal nutrition to maximize performance, reduce the risk of injury and illness, and ensure the best recovery after exercise,” explains nutritionist Alex White.

And while we’re talking about a large amount of food – sometimes up to 7,000 calories a day – that’s not always nearly as fun as it sounds, says sports nutritionist and nutritionist Chris Cashin.

“Athletes tell me that they eat so much during the day that it can sometimes become a chore,” she explains.

While men average around 2,500 calories a day and women around 2,000, Cashin says professional athletes may need 3-5,000 calories. Some consume even more; For example, Tour de France cyclists probably needed 6-7,000 calories a day.

So what about “normal” fitness fans who want to improve? Here, White and Cashin discuss what professional athletes eat and how it relates to the average exerciser.

Timing is the key for the professionals

Professional athletes typically have higher energy (calories), protein, and carbohydrate needs than the general population, White says, but the specifics will vary by sport. A powerlifter likely has different nutritional needs than a long-distance runner, for example.

“On a professional level, it’s all about timing, and athletes often eat different amounts of food on different days depending on what time they’re training or competing,” says Cashin. “Recovery is also a big thing – if you’re in a sport where you compete in laps, you need to make sure you are fueled up for the next lap.

“So when it’s around 800 m or 1,500 m, it will take them a couple of hours to rebuild their glycogen stores. So if you get off the track, you must immediately remember to refuel. ”

What about “normal” exercisers?

Be sure to eat before and after the gym. Image: PA.

As for normal mortals? “If you want to get more active and stay healthy and improve, a healthy, varied diet is the foundation for improving performance,” says White.

That means, he says, getting fruits and vegetables five times a day, choosing mostly whole grain carbohydrates like whole grain bread, whole wheat pasta or brown rice, and eating a variety of different sources of protein, including plant-based proteins like beans and lentils, alongside animal proteins like Meat, fish and eggs. (Although the plant-based diet is also becoming increasingly popular with athletes.)

“If you’re just going to the gym regularly, make sure you’ve eaten a few hours beforehand, and maybe consider having a banana or some fruit before and something like that afterwards,” suggests Cashin. “But apart from that, and if you drink enough fluids, you don’t really need anything else to eat.”

Pack extra calories

It is crucial for the professionals to consume enough calories. “Professional athletes are definitely going to be consuming a lot more calories than you or I could eat,” says Cashin. “Sometimes you have to be resourceful and resort to things that you might not suggest to the general public that are very high in fast-releasing carbohydrates, like candy or jaffa cakes, so they can get energy on board quickly.”

Getting the protein balance right

White says regular exercisers don’t need much extra protein as they get more active, but it is worth thinking about when and what to include. “It can be beneficial to spread your protein intake throughout the day – think about ways to get lean protein for breakfast, including eggs, beans, yogurt, or fish,” he says.

Also, try out different sources. While animal proteins provide all of the amino acids the body needs, it is also good to include plant-based proteins as they provide a different spectrum of nutrients and are high in fiber and low in fat. “We can still get all of the amino acids we need as long as we have a varied diet,” says White.

Do not forget to drink fluids

Cashin says a lot of people overeat protein. “If you eat a few servings of meat, fish, cheese, egg or a vegetarian alternative and you have some milk or a milk alternative, that should be enough,” she emphasizes.

“You also get quite a bit of protein in things like pasta and bread. It’s very unusual to find people who are low in protein. ”People who do high-impact exercises like lifting weights may need a little more, but according to Cashin, most people need anywhere from 1.2 to 1.7 grams of protein per kg Body weight. “There is evidence that if you ingest more than 2g of protein per kg, you’re wasting your time because it doesn’t do anything,” she adds.

Supplements or not?

White believes that for laypeople “there is no need for nutritional supplements or special sports products. We can get all of the nutrients and fluids we need through a healthy diet and plenty of water. Save money by bringing healthy snacks and a drink when you exercise, ”suggests White.

However, says Cashin, professional athletes sometimes need a protein supplement: “You may need to use a protein supplement to match their protein intake. I was really an opponent of supplements, but now I’ve found that some athletes cannot do without them. They need a recovery drink with extra protein, and if they’re not hungry after a competition or training session, a protein shake with some carbohydrates is very useful. ”

Healthy snacks

It is important to find out which foods agree with you before an event.  Image: PA.It is important to find out which foods agree with you before an event. Image: PA.

If you enjoy having pre-workout or post-workout snacks, keep them healthy, advises White. He suggests trying unsalted nuts and seeds, fresh fruit, whole grain crispbreads with nut butter, or vegetable sticks with hummus or cream cheese.

And extra carbohydrates?

Cashin says that long distance runners may need fuel while running, so they could have a carbohydrate beverage. “They’re fed up with it so I give them homemade versions that they can make themselves. You just dissolve 10 teaspoons of sugar in a little warm water, add a pinch of salt and make up to one liter with cold water, and then add some sugar-free pumpkin, ”she says. “Some have added other things, like vitamins, but basically they’re all the same. It provides carbohydrates if you exercise for more than an hour, so they can be useful for a marathon or half marathon. ”

Always test drive

If you want to try a high-carb drink, food or supplement that will keep you energized through a big workout or event, it is important to first find out if you like it. “If you’ve never done it before and try it on a run, you could get an upset stomach,” warns Cashin.

“Never try something during a race that you have never done before.”

Exercise on an empty stomach

Some people thrive on training on an empty stomach, Cashin says.

“Recently some articles were published showing that some people, especially women, are better at exercising in the morning when they have nothing to eat. What it highlights is that we are all different. Gone are the days when all dietitians said you had to have breakfast. ”

She suggests that people who exercise in the morning before they eat eat an extensive breakfast afterwards and perhaps have a snack the night before bed.

“Take something as light as a bowl of cereal – it won’t sit on your stomach and you will have energy overnight and can catch up after your workout.”

Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

The unexpected correlation between whole grains and waist size

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According to a new study, you no longer have to be afraid of bread. While you may already know that consuming whole grains instead of processed bread can lower your blood sugar and help your heart, a recent study from Tufts University just confirmed that whole grains can reduce your waist size.

What’s the story with grain?

Believe it or not, grains are tough seeds. It is eaten whole or ground into a fine, easily consumable powder. While substances like wheat, rye, barley, rice, or cornmeal are all considered grain products, preparing and consuming them can make all the difference to your health.

In general, there are two ways that grains can be prepared: whole grains and refined grains. Whole grains are the more unprocessed of the two because they contain the entire core and are not stripped of bran and germs. They also have a thicker texture, more fiber, and a shorter shelf life. Whole grains can include anything from whole grain breads to oatmeal or brown rice, all of which are high in fiber and have an earthy taste than their refined counterparts.

In refined grains, however, bran and germ are processed to create a lighter, smoother texture. Often times they are fortified with vitamins and nutrients, but rarely do they contain the same nutritional benefits as whole grains. In this category you will find white flour, white bread and white rice.

Are Whole Grains Really That Much Better Than Refined Grains?

Life may be complicated, but grains aren’t: Studies show that excess refined grains can cause irreparable harm to your health.

In particular, a February 2021 study found that consuming a large amount of processed grains resulted in a 47% increase in stroke risk, a 33% increase in heart disease risk, and 27% increase over your lifetime. Probability of previous death. The products examined in this study included pasta and white bread, dessert items such as cakes and cookies, or breakfast cereals and crackers.

On the other hand, Harvard researchers found that consuming whole grains reduced the risk of cancer by 20%. In another meta-study, participants over 50 were 30% less likely to die from an inflammatory condition such as asthma, gout, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, or other autoimmune diseases.

Some scientists even believe that processed grains contain “anti-nutrients” that prevent the body from getting essential vitamins and minerals from other foods, and that whole grains prevent the body from triggering an inflammatory response.

How do they affect the waist size?

While you may have already known that whole grains make a long, happy life possible, they can benefit your exterior as well as your interior.

The above-mentioned 2021 study by Tufts University measured 3,100 participants ages 50+ and collected data on their various grain eating habits every four years. Surprisingly, the numbers showed that for every four-year check-in, the waist size of those who ate mostly refined grains increased by up to 2.5 cm. However, those who stuck with whole grains had a waist gain of no more than half an inch.

Why this is so, researchers have suggested that the fiber in whole grains can prevent blood sugar spikes, which helps keep your metabolism stable. A lead researcher on the study tells US News that the nutrients found in whole grains can also work in synergy with the other nutrients in the diet and that, while research is still underway, the interplay between various dietary vitamins and minerals in the diet The intestinal system could potentially determine their long-term health.

Take that away

While it may seem easy to tell the difference between these two grains, it can become difficult if you don’t think critically about your food choices. Healthline reports that you shouldn’t be fooled by a “whole grain” label on something like processed grains as if it might contain germs and bran. The extent to which the grain has been pulverized has effectively eliminated the nutritional value.

The most important thing is the following: Whole grains ensure a longer lifespan and a slim waist. But you still have to use your noodle when choosing grains; If something says it contains whole grains but the nutritional information says it is high in sugar or carbohydrates, leave it on the shelf.

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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Good Carbs, Bad Carbs — How to Make the Right Choices

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The amount of carbohydrates we should be consuming is a much debated topic.

The dietary guidelines suggest that we get about half of our calories from carbohydrates.

On the other hand, some claim that carbohydrates can lead to obesity and type 2 diabetes and that most people should avoid them.

There are good arguments on both sides, but our bodies need carbohydrates to function well.

This article goes into detail about carbohydrates, their health effects, and how to make the best choices for yourself.

Carbohydrates, or carbohydrates, are molecules with atoms of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen.

In nutrition, “carbohydrates” refers to one of the three macronutrients. The other two are protein and fat.

Dietary carbohydrates can be divided into three main categories:

  • Sugar. These are sweet, short-chain carbohydrates found in foods. Examples are glucose, fructose, galactose and sucrose.
  • Strengthen. These are long chains of glucose molecules that are eventually broken down into glucose in the digestive system.
  • Fiber. Humans cannot digest fiber, but the bacteria in the digestive system can use some of it. Also, eating fiber is vital to your overall health.

One of the primary purposes of carbohydrates in our diet is to provide energy to our bodies.

Most of the carbohydrates are broken down or converted into glucose, which can be used as energy. Carbohydrates can also be converted into fat (stored energy) for later use.

Fiber is an exception. It doesn’t provide energy directly, but it does feed the friendly bacteria in the digestive system. These bacteria can use the fiber to produce fatty acids that some of our cells can use for energy.

Sugar alcohols are also classified as carbohydrates. They taste sweet but usually aren’t high in calories.

Summary

Carbohydrates are one of the three macronutrients. The main types of carbohydrates in food are sugar, starch, and fiber.

“Whole” vs. “Refined” carbohydrates

Not all carbohydrates are created equal.

There are many different types of carbohydrate foods that can vary in their health effects.

Carbohydrates are sometimes referred to as “simple” versus “complex” or “whole” versus “refined”.

Whole carbohydrates are unprocessed and contain the fiber found naturally in the diet, while refined carbohydrates have been processed and the natural fiber has been removed or altered.

Examples of whole carbohydrates are:

  • vegetables
  • Andean millet
  • just
  • legumes
  • Potatoes
  • full grain

On the other hand, refined carbohydrates include:

  • sugar-sweetened drinks
  • White bread
  • Pastries
  • other items made from white flour

Numerous studies show that consumption of refined carbohydrates is linked to health conditions such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (1, 2, 3).

Refined carbohydrates tend to drive blood sugar levels up, leading to a subsequent crash that can induce hunger pangs and lead to food cravings (4, 5).

In addition, they usually lack important nutrients. In other words, they are “empty” calories.

There are also added sugars that should be limited as they have been linked to all sorts of chronic diseases (6, 7, 8, 9).

However, not all carbohydrate foods should be demonized because of the negative health effects of processed products.

Whole carbohydrate sources are loaded with nutrients and fiber and don’t cause the same spikes and dips in blood sugar levels.

Numerous studies of high-fiber carbohydrates, including vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains, show that consumption is linked to improved metabolic health and a lower risk of disease (10, 11, 12, 13, 14).

Summary

Not all carbohydrates are created equal. Refined carbohydrates have been linked to obesity and metabolic disorders, but unprocessed carbohydrates have many health benefits.

No discussion of carbohydrates is complete without mentioning low-carbohydrate diets.

These types of diets limit carbohydrates while allowing plenty of protein and fat.

Although there are studies showing that a low-carb diet can help you lose weight, they usually focus on people with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and / or type 2 diabetes.

Some of these studies show that a low-carb diet can promote weight loss and lead to improvements in various health markers, including HDL “good” cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure, and others compared to the standard “low-fat” diet (15, 16, 17, 18, 19 ).

However, a review of more than 1,000 studies found that low-carbohydrate diets produced positive results in less than and after 6–11 months, but after 2 years there was no significant effect on cardiovascular risk factors (20).

In addition, a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 1999-2010 that analyzed low-carbohydrate diets and the risk of death found that those who consumed the least amount of carbohydrates were prone to die prematurely from all causes, including Stroke, cancer, and coronary artery disease (21, 22, 23).

Summary

Just because low-carbohydrate diets can be beneficial for weight loss for some people, they are not the answer for everyone.

“Carbohydrates” are not the cause of obesity

Although limiting carbohydrates can lead to weight loss, it does not mean that the consumption of carbohydrates in itself caused the weight gain.

This is actually a myth that has been debunked.

While it’s true that added sugars and refined carbohydrates are linked to an increased risk of obesity, the same is not true of high-fiber, whole-carbohydrate sources.

In fact, people have been eating carbohydrates in some form for thousands of years.

But the rate of obesity development began to rise since the mid-20th century, increasing around 1980 when 4.8 percent of men and 7.9 percent of women were obese.

Today our numbers have grown exponentially and 42.4 percent of adults are obese (24).

It is also worth noting that some populations have maintained excellent health while eating a high-carbohydrate diet.

The Okinawa population and Kitavan islanders, who get a significant portion of their daily caloric intake from carbohydrates, have one of the longest life expectancies (25).

What they have in common is that they eat real, unprocessed food.

However, populations that consume large amounts of refined carbohydrates and processed foods tend to be at greater risk of developing negative health outcomes.

Summary

People consumed carbohydrates long before the obesity epidemic, and there are many examples of populations who have maintained excellent health despite a high-carbohydrate diet.

Carbohydrates are not “essential,” but many foods that contain carbohydrates are incredibly healthy

Many people on a low-carb diet claim that carbohydrates are not an essential nutrient.

This may be true to some extent, but they are an important part of a balanced diet.

Some believe that the brain doesn’t need the recommended 130 grams of carbohydrates per day. While some areas of the brain can use ketones, the brain relies on carbohydrates to provide its fuel (26, 27).

In addition, diets high in carbohydrate foods such as vegetables and fruits offer a variety of health benefits.

While it is possible to survive even on a carbohydrate-free diet, this is likely not an optimal choice as you will be missing out on plant-based foods that are scientifically proven.

Summary

Carbohydrates are not an “essential” nutrient.

However, many high-carbohydrate plant-based foods are loaded with beneficial nutrients so you may not feel optimal if you avoid them.

How to make the right decisions

As a general rule, carbohydrates in their natural, high-fiber form are healthy, while carbohydrates without fiber are not healthy.

If it’s a whole food with a single ingredient, it is likely a healthy food for most people, regardless of the carbohydrate content.

Instead of looking at carbohydrates as either “good” or “bad”, focus on increasing whole and complex options over the processed ones.

In nutrition, things are seldom black and white. But the following foods are a better source of carbohydrates.

  • Vegetables. All of them. It’s best to eat a variety of vegetables every day.
  • Whole fruits. Apples, bananas, strawberries, etc.
  • Legumes. Lentils, kidney beans, peas, etc.
  • Nuts. Almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, peanuts, etc.
  • Seeds. Chia seeds and pumpkin seeds.
  • Full grain. Choose grains that are really whole, like in pure oats, quinoa, brown rice, etc.
  • Tubers. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, etc.

These foods may be acceptable in moderation to some people, but many do best if they avoid them as much as possible.

  • Sugary drinks. These are sodas, fruit juices with added sugar, and beverages sweetened with high fructose corn syrup.
  • White bread. These are refined carbohydrates that are low in essential nutrients and have a negative impact on metabolic health. This applies to most commercially available breads.
  • Pastries, cookies and cakes. These foods are usually very high in sugar and refined wheat.
  • Ice cream. Most ice creams are very high in sugar, although there are exceptions.
  • Candies and chocolates. If you want to eat chocolate, choose good quality dark chocolate.
  • French fries and potato chips. Whole potatoes are healthy. However, french fries and potato chips do not offer the nutritional benefits of whole potatoes.

Summary

Carbohydrates in their natural, high-fiber form are generally healthy.

Processed foods containing sugar and refined carbohydrates do not provide the same nutritional benefits as carbohydrates in their natural form and are more likely to lead to negative health outcomes.

Low carb is great for some, but others work best on high carbohydrates

There is no one size fits all solution in diet.

The “optimal” carbohydrate intake depends on numerous factors, such as:

  • old
  • gender
  • Metabolic health
  • physical activity
  • Food culture
  • personal preference

If you are overweight or have conditions such as metabolic syndrome and / or type 2 diabetes, you may be sensitive to carbohydrates.

In this case, it is likely to be beneficial to reduce carbohydrate intake.

On the flip side, if you’re just trying to stay healthy, there is probably no reason for you to avoid “carbohydrates.” However, it is still important to eat as much whole foods with just one ingredient as possible.

In fact, if your body type is naturally lean and / or you are very physically active, you can function much better with lots of carbohydrates in your diet.

For more information about the right amount of carbohydrates for you, talk to your doctor.

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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Making wise food choices – The Australian Jewish News

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As we get older, we often need fewer kilojoules because we are less active than we were when we were younger. However, we still need a similar amount of nutrients, sometimes more. This change in dietary needs means that our food choices must be nutritious while also being appetizing and enjoyable in order to maintain a healthy, regular appetite.

1. Enjoy different foods. Appetite can often decrease as you age, so consuming a wide variety of foods can help keep the food interesting. Eat nutrient-rich foods from all five food groups on a daily basis, including:

♦ lots of vegetables, legumes (eg baked beans, kidney beans and chickpeas) and fruit;

♦ lots of grains, including bread, rice, pasta, and noodles – preferably whole grains;

♦ lean meat, fish, poultry and / or alternatives;

♦ Milk, yoghurt, cheese and / or alternatives – choose low-fat varieties if possible.

Discretionary foods such as lollies, chocolates, soft drinks and cakes do not fit into the food groups. These are not needed for our body and should only be consumed from time to time or in small amounts.

2. Drink plenty of water. As we get older, we often don’t feel thirsty, even when our body needs fluids. We must have regular beverages, which can include water and other beverages such as soda water, fruit juice, and milk. Small amounts of tea and coffee can also be included.

3. Make changes for good health
Fiber: Choose high fiber foods like fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grain breads and cereals to promote good colon health.

Protein: Make sure you eat high protein foods like meat, fish, poultry, eggs, soybeans, and nuts. Our need for protein increases when we get over 70 years old – protein in our diet helps wound healing, which can be important as older people tend to experience more injuries and surgeries.

Calcium: Enjoy foods rich in calcium such as low-fat milk, cheese, and custard
Yogurt, used to prevent or slow the progression of osteoporosis. Calcium-fortified soy milk and fish with soft, edible bones like canned salmon or sardines are also good sources of calcium.

Vitamin D: Vitamin D is also important for bone health in older adults. We get vitamin D mainly from sunlight and smaller amounts from foods including: margarine, dairy products, oily fish, cheese and eggs. If you are mostly caged indoors and not exposed to a lot of sunlight, you should seek advice on vitamin D supplements from a doctor.

Limit Saturated Fats and Salt: Limit the saturated fats you eat and keep track of your total fat intake. Limit your use of salt and choose low-salt foods. Unfortunately, over the years, our sense of taste can decrease. But instead of adding
Salt, take a look at other ways to flavor food, such as: B. with spices or fresh herbs.

4th Eat to suit your lifestyle: The amount and type of food we eat can be affected by lifestyle changes as we age. These can include: lack of energy or motivation to prepare food, feeling lonely or anxious, not feeling hungry, having trouble swallowing or chewing, decreased sense of taste, and not being as physically active. These lifestyle changes often result in meals being skipped and generally poorly eaten. So use strategies and simple ways to encourage regular meals.

5. Tips for eating regularly
♦ Eat at a similar time each day to build a routine.

♦ Use ready-made meals such as frozen vegetables, canned fruit or ready-made meals (choose the low-salt and low-sugar variant). These take less time and energy.

Eating small, regular meals instead of just a few larger meals will help you get all of the nutrients you need without having to eat a lot at once.

♦ Avoid drinking with meals as this can fill you up and affect your appetite.

♦ When you feel tired, choose moist or softer foods so that you don’t have to use as much force to chew and swallow.

♦ Adding herbs, spices and spices (e.g. lemon juice) to meals adds flavor to the food.

♦ Seek help from friends, family, or other non-profit organization such as meals-on-wheels.

More information is available at www.eatforhealth.gov.au.

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