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Whole Grain Benefits

How To Have Cheat Meals Without Sabotaging Your Diet

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If you are very serious about losing weight and you are well on your way to achieving your goals, then you know how much sacrifice you have made just to get where you are. However, you might have slipped in a few cheat meals here and there and that’s fine. You don’t need to feel guilty about it. Other people (even those who are physically fit) have their share of Cheat Days (although it’s better not to extend them to the whole day) and Cheat Meals too.

The key here is to make sure the foods you eat don’t ruin your diet and negatively affect your weight loss or physical fitness journey. This article will give you some helpful ideas on how to eat cheat meals without sabotaging your diet. People differ in what, when and how often they eat cheat meals.

Keeping these factors in mind will help you follow a healthy eating plan if you ever decide to reward yourself with some special treats:

  1. Check and adjust the portions of your food

You can’t eat everything you want for cheat meals unless you are on a very low-calorie diet. There is a reason. The fact is, eating a healthy diet is all about achieving your goals, and some cheat meals are so high in calories that they can destroy all of the calorie deficits you have been working so hard for all week. It is important that this one meal doesn’t overshadow your goals and your hard work. Everyone won’t want their efforts to be washed down the drain just because of the craving for ice cream, and they’ll end up drinking a whole tub of it. The best way to avoid this is to cut the portion down or replace it entirely with low-calorie desserts.

Although you do choose to indulge yourself on weekends and other days of the week, you should be very conscious of it and still keep it in moderation. That way, you can feel better about yourself after your cheat meal and keep your waistline, blood sugar level, and goals intact.

  1. Don’t feel guilty

If you feel bad or guilty about being pampered, you can expect weight gain and a bad relationship with food. Feeling bad or guilty not only denies you pleasure, it eventually leads to emotional eating. While a single treat or meal won’t clutter your diet, it can derail your response to eating and grabbing it.

Therefore, change your mindset and do not guilty of indulging on occasion. You’re only human. Feelings of guilt are a heavy burden that will eventually pull you down. This will lead to all of the negative thoughts and will feed you with stress and anxiety. So before you take a bite out of this delicious burger, tell yourself that you deserve it.

  1. Chew your food slowly while enjoying the taste

One reason for a cheat meal is to satisfy yourself so that you can enjoy your healthy diet more and not starve all the time. In the case of a cheat meal, it’s best if you chew it up slowly and enjoy its flavor.

The longer you eat, the more likely you are to realize when you are full, as it takes your brain around 20 minutes to send signals telling you that you have enough to eat. This way, you can avoid excessive indulgence and consume fewer calories. In addition, if you don’t pamper yourself too much, you’ll feel better than if you finished everything in a few minutes.

Setting a timer can be helpful when you cannot control your eating habits. Using a timer can potentially help you eat more slowly and consciously.

  1. Prioritize foods that contain protein

Your diet can affect your fitness goals. You should consider adding protein to any cheat meal to do your digestive system a favor. A high-carbohydrate meal will make life difficult for your body, skyrocket your blood sugar levels, and have a negative impact on your health.

However, your body cannot store protein in the same way that other macronutrients can. Therefore, whenever you consume protein, you fill up your amino acid pool, which is particularly important. So if you want to reward yourself with a healthy diet after a busy week, opt for delicious protein dishes.

  1. Create a healthier alternative to your favorite dish

Even if you shouldn’t limit yourself to what you crave, you can still make your cravings more nutritious. There are numerous ways to do this. And plenty of recipe resources online to turn something unhealthy into something innocent. For example, you can personalize the preparation of a pizza by using whole grains for the crust and choosing vegetables, olives for topping and less cheese.

Conclusion

The first thing you should do is reconsider your cheat meal so that you don’t regain the weight you lost from exercising so hard and strictly following your diet. Everyone is unique in their health. Remember that the information in these articles is not intended to replace expert advice.

While this is all sound advice, always consult your primary care doctor or dietitian before making any significant changes to your lifestyle or diet. This is the best way to judge your own health, but always listen to expert opinions.

Whole Grain Benefits

What to eat, avoid, and more

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Cholesterol is a waxy substance found in every cell in the body. Consuming too much cholesterol in the diet increases cardiovascular problems. Avoiding certain foods reduces the risks.

Cholesterol performs important functions, including:

However, high blood cholesterol levels can cause health problems such as high blood pressure and atherosclerosis. To lower high cholesterol or maintain healthy cholesterol levels, it is important to make lifestyle changes and reduce dietary cholesterol levels.

This article reviews the causes of high cholesterol, foods to avoid, and some low-cholesterol foods and low-cholesterol lunches.

Cholesterol is bound to specific proteins while being transported throughout the body. The combination of wax substance and proteins is called lipoprotein.

There are different types of lipoproteins depending on what is attached, but the two main types of cholesterol are:

  • Low-density lipoprotein (LDL): This is known as the “bad” cholesterol. It transports cholesterol from the liver to various parts of the body. LDL cholesterol can build up in veins and arteries, narrowing them and restricting blood flow. A high LDL level is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.
  • High Density Lipoprotein (HDL): This is known as the “good” cholesterol. It transports cholesterol from the body back to the liver for processing and elimination. A high HDL level is considered cardioprotective.

Genetic factors can lead to high blood cholesterol levels. This means that some individuals produce excessive amounts of cholesterol – particularly LDL cholesterol – leading to high blood cholesterol levels. This is called genetic or familial hypercholesterolemia.

Certain lifestyle factors can affect cholesterol levels. For example, eating foods that contain high amounts of cholesterol, saturated fat, and trans fat has been shown to increase blood cholesterol levels.

These are found in the following foods:

  • Processed carbohydrates: This includes white bread and white pasta.
  • Saturated Fatty Acids: This includes red meat, whole dairy, and processed foods.
  • trans fats: This includes fried and highly processed foods like cookies, crackers, and donuts.

Other lifestyle factors that can contribute to high cholesterol include smoking tobacco products and inactivity.

Some medical conditions can also cause high cholesterol, including:

Individuals who wish to lower their blood cholesterol levels can make some lifestyle changes to achieve this.

These strategies include:

  • Exercise regularly
  • Avoidance of Tobacco – Smoking is associated with unfavorable lipoprotein profiles
  • Reducing consumption of foods high in cholesterol, saturated fats and trans fats
  • maintaining a moderate body mass index
  • Eat enough fiber, especially soluble fiber

Increasing your consumption of soluble fiber can lower cholesterol levels. This is because soluble fiber turns into a gel and attaches to cholesterol in the small intestine. This gel helps push it through the digestive system for the body to dispose of through feces.

Foods that contain high amounts of soluble fiber include:

  • Legumes, peas and beans
  • fruit
  • oatmeal
  • just
  • vegetables
  • most root vegetables

Individuals with a family history of high cholesterol should consult their doctor to determine if they are at risk of inheriting the condition. If so, they can work together to develop a strategy to minimize their risk.

Low cholesterol foods tend to be lower in fat. That means plant-based foods and low-fat proteins are excellent low-cholesterol options.

Processed foods can also sometimes contain cholesterol. People can check this by reading the nutritional label and paying attention to the serving size.

Examples of low-cholesterol food groups include:

legumes

  • black beans
  • kidney beans
  • Chickpeas
  • navy beans
  • pinto beans
  • broad beans
  • Lentils – red, black and green

fruit

  • apples
  • bananas
  • strawberries
  • blueberries
  • raspberries
  • oranges
  • watermelon
  • Cantaloupe melon
  • mango
  • pineapple

vegetables

  • spinach
  • Kale
  • aubergine
  • okra
  • sweet potato
  • potato
  • carrots
  • broccoli
  • the brussel sprouts
  • cabbage

nuts

  • cashew nuts
  • almonds
  • walnuts
  • pecans
  • hazelnuts
  • pistachios
  • macadamia nuts
  • pine nuts

Whole grains, muesli and pasta

  • Oats and oatmeal
  • whole grain breads
  • Wholemeal crackers
  • Pasta, especially whole grain or lentil varieties
  • cold cereals, especially whole grains or bran
  • bran products
  • rice

soy

  • soybeans
  • tofu
  • Soy milk
  • tempeh
  • miso

Fatty fish and meat

  • salmon
  • tuna
  • halibut
  • work work
  • yellowtail
  • chicken
  • Turkey
  • lean steak

Different food items

  • onions
  • mushrooms
  • garlic
  • ginger
  • honey
  • mustard
  • Ketchup
  • Chia seeds

Reducing the consumption of cholesterol-containing foods can help lower blood cholesterol levels.

Some examples of low cholesterol lunch ideas include:

  • vegetarian or turkey sandwich or wrap
  • Broth-based vegetable soup or lentil soup
  • Salads with low-fat or olive oil-based dressings
  • Salmon with rice and roasted broccoli
  • Tofu or Ground Turkey Chili
  • Pasta salad with roasted vegetables and chicken
  • Overnight oats with fruits and nuts
  • Chicken or tofu and vegetable stir-fry with brown rice
  • Mediterranean quinoa with feta, cucumber, red onions and olives

Read on for a diet plan to lower cholesterol.

Research has also examined the benefits of the traditional Mediterranean diet.

The Mediterranean food pyramid lists the consumption of foods in various amounts and frequencies:

  • Dairy products, nuts, seeds, legumes every day
  • Fruits, vegetables, healthy fats like olive oil, whole grains, nuts with every main meal
  • at least 2 servings of fish or seafood per week
  • 2 servings of white meat and 2-4 servings of eggs weekly
  • Limit red meat to no more than 2 servings per week and sweets to no more than 3 servings per week

The study showed that this type of diet protects against cardiovascular disease and lowers LDL cholesterol levels.

Read more for a Mediterranean meal plan here.

Cholesterol is an endogenous substance with many important functions. However, high blood cholesterol can be problematic as it increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

There are many strategies that can help lower or maintain a person’s cholesterol levels, including diet.

By eating more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and reducing the consumption of foods that contain cholesterol, saturated fat, and trans fat, individuals can help control their cholesterol levels.

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Whole Grain Benefits

Which diet is the healthiest? One eating hack can boost more than your body

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Scientists, nutritionists, and social media influencers have made their careers researching what—exactly—makes the best diet. In recent years, the Paleo diet, which attempts to replicate what our ancient ancestors were said to have eaten, has been pitted against the keto diet (essentially a version of the Atkins diet) and intermittent fasting (which insists there isn’t any diet is) fought for supremacy. But there’s one diet that almost all scientists agree is healthy for your body, your brain — and maybe even the planet.

Many nutritionists have long emphasized that a balanced diet consisting primarily of vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds, legumes and fruits is ideal for a healthy adult body and has numerous health benefits.

In other words: a plant-based diet. As it turns out, this type of diet is not only good for human health — it can also save the planet from the climate crisis.

In a recent study published in the journal Nature, scientists show how people in higher-income countries could remove enough carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to keep the global temperature from rising above 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius by switching to a plant-based diet change.

Two degrees is the upper warming limit set by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel to contain the worst effects of the climate crisis.

Specifically, researchers cite the EAT-Lancet diet as the healthiest diet for you and the planet. Here’s what you need to know.

What is the EAT Lancet Diet?

An infographic summarizing the plant-based diet recommended by the EAT-Lancet Commission. The diet is high in vegetables and low in meat.

The world population is expected to grow to 10 billion people over the course of the 21st century. Feeding this growing population in a way that is sustainable for the planet will be a challenge.

The EAT-LANCET Commission brought together leading scientists to determine the best “Planetary Health” diet – a diet to promote human health and protect the sustainability of the environment in line with the UN’s climate goals. (You can read the full report here.)

People in higher-income countries make up just 17 percent of the world’s population, but if they switch to a plant-based diet, we could eliminate the equivalent of “about 14 years of current global agricultural emissions,” the researchers say.

According to the Commission, the two main components a meal that follows the guidelines of the Planetary Health Diet:

  1. Half a plate of vegetables and fruit.
  2. Half a plate with a mix of “whole grains, plant-based protein sources, unsaturated vegetable oils, and (optionally) modest amounts of animal-based protein sources.”

The number of calories, on the other hand, would depend on the needs of the person.

Here is a more detailed breakdown of what a person can eat on an average day as part of the planetary health diet:

  • Whole grains (rice, wheat, corn, etc.): 232 grams or 811 calories
  • Starchy vegetables (potatoes and cassava): 39 calories
  • Fruit: 200 grams or 78 calories
  • Dairy: 250 grams or 153 calories
  • Protein: Can vary from 14 to 50 grams (30 to 291 calories) depending on whether it is animal protein (ie beef, lamb, poultry, fish, eggs) or plant protein (legumes and nuts).
  • Added Fats: Unsaturated Oils (40 grams or 354 calories) or Saturated Oils (11.8 grams or 96 calories)
  • Added Sugar: 31 grams or 120 calories

The commission’s scientists conclude that a plant-based diet is a “win-win” for the earth and humanity, stating: “A diet high in plant-based foods and lower in animal-based foods brings both improved health and environmental benefits.”

Why is the planetary health diet good for the earth?

If people in high-income countries switch to a plant-based diet and we convert farmland to natural vegetation, we can make a big contribution to curbing global warming, researchers find.Getty

Food systems in rich countries contribute a lot to the climate crisis. As the researchers report in the latest Nature study, the global food system emits 13.7 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide emissions annually, or about 26 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions.

Animal production, along with land use, “constitutes the majority of these emissions.”

Per capita meat consumption in richer countries is six times higher than in lower-income countries. Greenhouse gas emissions from meat consumption are also significantly higher: animal-based products account for 70 percent of greenhouse gas emissions from food systems in richer countries, but only 22 percent in lower-middle-income countries.

“Hence, dietary changes in high-income countries could have the potential to significantly reduce agricultural emissions around the world,” the researchers write.

If people in higher-income countries transition to the plant-based diets outlined here and return farmland of animal origin to natural vegetation, researchers say we can reduce annual agricultural greenhouse gas emissions from those countries by 61.5 percent and save up to 98.3 gigatons carbon dioxide in the soil.

Besides saving the planet, EAT-Lancet is also crucially good for human health, which can help people in wealthier countries adapt to a plant-based diet.

Why is the planetary health diet good for humans?

Eating a plant-based diet has numerous benefits, from reducing obesity to improving heart health. Getty

The food best suited to cooling down a warming planet is also extraordinarily good for human health.

“Healthy plant-based eating should be recommended as an environmentally responsible dietary option for improved cardiovascular health,” researchers write in a separate 2018 report.

Numerous studies shed light on how plant-based eating can improve or reduce the risk of a variety of health conditions, including:

“Improving plant-based diet quality over a 12-year period was associated with a reduced risk of total and [cardiovascular disease] mortality, while increased consumption of an unhealthy plant-based diet is associated with a higher risk of total and [cardiovascular disease] mortality,” researchers write in another 2019 study.

Animal proteins provide essential nutrients like iron and zinc. So if you choose to eat a plant-based diet, it’s important to get enough plant-based protein from other sources to make up for the loss.

Iron-rich foods include legumes, nuts and seeds, and whole grain breads – all of which are included on the ideal plate, according to EAT-Lancet guidelines.

For this reason, following a diet with specific guidelines for consumption — like the EAT-Lancet Planetary Health Diet — can ensure you’re still getting essential nutrients and protein despite following a plant-based diet.

The reverse analysis – Whether you’re trying to convince a friend to cut down on his meat intake or working to include more leafy greens in your own diet, it’s helpful to remember the connections between the planet and our own bodies.

After all, skipping a cheeseburger because of global warming might seem like an abstraction, but when you consider that your heart health is at stake, you’re more likely to choose a healthier, plant-based option that also has tremendous benefits for the planet.

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Whole Grain Benefits

Fiber offers many health benefits

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Conversations and advice about nutritional components seem to be in the news all the time. Low carb here, high protein there. But one thing that doesn’t get nearly the attention it should is fiber.

When you learn about all the benefits of getting enough fiber, you’re wondering why we’re not talking about it more. According to the National Institutes of Health, fiber is found in the plants you eat, including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. It is sometimes referred to as bulk or roughage.

Some people probably don’t talk much about fiber because we primarily associate it with normalizing bowel movements and relieving constipation. However, there are many other health benefits of fiber as well. Some studies suggest that a high-fiber diet may also help you lose weight and reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer.

There are two forms of fiber – soluble and insoluble. Both are good for us for different reasons. Soluble fiber dissolves in water to form a gel-like substance that binds to fats. This helps lower blood cholesterol levels, especially LDL or bad cholesterol. Soluble fiber also slows the absorption of glucose, which may help people with diabetes. Insoluble fiber is also helpful as it bulks up the stool and helps it move through the body more efficiently.

In general, whole fruits, legumes, and vegetables are good sources of both types of fiber. Take an apple for example; The skin consists of insoluble fiber and the fleshy part contains soluble fiber.

The latest USDA dietary guidelines recommend women eat at least 21 to 25 grams of fiber per day, while men should aim for 30 to 38 grams per day. Our American average is only about 10 to 15 grams per day. In practice, you could get 27 grams of fiber by eating ½ cup chopped vegetables (4g fiber), 1 medium whole fruit with peel (4g fiber), 2 slices of 100% whole wheat bread (6g fiber), ½ cup eat black beans (8 g fiber) and ¾ oatmeal (5 g fiber).

Dan Remley, our OSU Extension Food, Nutrition and Wellness field specialist, has developed a great resource called Fiber Fills You Up, Fills your Wallet and Fuels Your Health. In it, Remley says, “High-fiber meals are lower in calories, affordable, and can help your family feel full after a meal.”

He has a few fiber tips to help you gradually add more fiber to your day:

  • Eat oatmeal several times a week.
  • For breakfast, choose a high-fiber breakfast cereal with 5 or more grams of fiber per serving. Choose grains with “whole grain,” “bran,” or “fiber” in the name. Or add a few tablespoons of unprocessed wheat bran to your favorite cereal.
  • Serve a meatless dinner once a week. Replace meat with beans.
  • Eat two servings of vegetables per meal.
  • Leave the skin on fruits and vegetables.
  • Add oatmeal to cookies.
  • Snack on nuts, dried fruits and popcorn.
  • Choose chips or crackers with at least 2 grams of fiber per serving.

On the other hand, there are some processed foods with added fiber sources. In some cases, this can be a helpful way to add more fiber to your diet. Be aware that these products are high in calories and may add more sugar or sodium than you think. Your best bet is to eat as many whole fruits and whole grains as possible rather than these formulated products.

Today I leave you with this quote from Desmond Tutu: “Do your little good where you are; It’s those little bits of good that overwhelm the world.”

Emily Marrison is an OSU Extension Family & Consumer Sciences Educator and can be reached at 740-622-2265.

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