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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

Is Farro Gluten-Free? | Livestrong.com

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While it’s a nutritious grain, Farro isn’t gluten-free.

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If it looks like a duck and croaks like a duck, then it’s a duck, right? This is not necessarily the case with Farro.

While Farro can easily be confused with gluten-free grains like brown rice, Farro is actually a variety of wheat, which means it is not gluten-free. So if you have a gluten intolerance or are gluten sensitive, keep Farro out of your pantry.

Is Farro Gluten Free?

Farro is a type of wheat that contains gluten proteins, according to the Foundation for Celiac Disease. Unlike most wheat varieties, Farro is often independently referenced, like quinoa, a gluten-free seed. Because of this, it’s easy to overlook the fact that Farro is actually wheat. It doesn’t help that Farro looks a bit like brown rice, which makes it easy to confuse the two.

Farro (also known as emmer, a type of farro) is one of the earliest forms of wheat and is native to the central Mediterranean, according to the Whole Grains Council. As a whole grain, Farro is high in nutrients such as fiber and calcium, which, according to Toby Amidor, RD, are largely under-consumed by most Americans.

Generally chewy and nutty in taste, Farro is made in water or broth like rice. According to the Whole Grains Council, the grain is usually eaten as whole grain kernels or wheat berries. For those who can eat and tolerate gluten, Farro is a nutritious addition to soups, salads, or almost any meal.

Are certain nutrients in your diet lacking?

Gluten-free alternatives to Farro

If you want to add some cereal to your daily diet but want to avoid gluten, there are plenty of alternatives for you to consider. Quinoa, buckwheat, rice, and millet are some pretty close comparisons and are easy to swap out for wheat, according to the Celiac Foundation.

While grains like brown rice or millet are inherently gluten-free, you should always check the packaging. Read the ingredients list first to make sure the grain you are buying doesn’t have any wheat, rye, or barley-based ingredients.

Or, look for a gluten-free label on the packaging, recommends Amidor. This is an FDA regulated mark that indicates the foods contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) gluten, making them generally safe for consumption, according to the FDA.

You may also see a seal from the Gluten Free Certification Organization. This third group rigorously tests and certifies thousands of gluten-free products. Each package with this seal contains less than 10 ppm gluten.

Tip

If you want to make sure that a food is gluten-free, look for either a gluten-free label or a seal on the packaging. Always check the nutritional table and the list of ingredients too!

If you’re looking to add some gluten-free grains to your diet, consider these options.

1. Natural Earth Products USDA Organic Kasha

Natural Earth Products USDA Bio Kasha

Natural Earth Products Organic Kasha is a single ingredient choice.

Credit: LIVESTRONG.com creative

2. Pride of India organic three-color quinoa

Pride of India Organic Tricolor Quinoa

Pride of India Organic Three Color Quinoa will add a touch of color and fiber to your dish.

Credit: LIVESTRONG.com creative

3. Bob’s Red Mill whole grain millet

Bob's Red Mill whole grain millet

Bob’s Red Mill whole grain millet goes well in grain bowls, on salads and as a side dish to your favorite protein.

Credit: LIVESTRONG.com creative

Gluten-free cereal recipes to try out

When you’ve stocked up on gluten-free cereals, these three easy-to-make recipes can help you incorporate them into your daily diet.

Easy gluten-free cereal recipe with quinoa in the morning

This recipe is nutritious and as easy as it gets.

Credit: LIVESTRONG.com

Although it’s actually a seed, quinoa is often treated like a grain because it looks and cooks like this in this simple recipe. You only need three ingredients and 15 minutes to prepare the perfect side dish for your breakfast. Serve next to fried eggs or even stir into an omelette. This quinoa also contains 6 grams of fiber to keep you feeling full all morning.

2. Cinnamon, spice and millet porridge

Cinnamon-Spice-Millet-Porridge Gluten-free cereal recipe

This recipe is full of wholesome whole grains and unsaturated fats.

Whether it’s fall or not, a cinnamon-flavored breakfast is always a good idea. This recipe combines a cup of millet with a variety of nuts and seeds, and adds some healthy, unsaturated fats to your breakfast. Nuts are great for your heart health and can help lower both cholesterol and inflammation levels, according to the Mayo Clinic.

3. Gluten-free breakfast pizza with cinnamon and honey drizzle

Gluten-free breakfast pizza with cinnamon-honey drizzle Gluten-free cereal recipe

This gluten-free pizza puts an end to boring breakfasts.

Credit: LIVESTRONG.COM/Susan brand

Gluten free pizza for breakfast … don’t say more. This sweet pizza recipe takes just 26 minutes and is packed with wholesome whole grains like quinoa and millet. Instead of mozzarella and hot peppers, this breakfast pizza is topped with fruit, which adds a good dose of vitamins and antioxidants to your breakfast.

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

From tacos to wings, learning to cook with plant-based meats

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It’s that time of year when many people decide to eat less meat. The “whys” are many: sustainability and concern for the planet, health considerations, ethical concerns about dealing with animals.

An increasingly popular option is “plant-based meat,” which can be found in meat aisles from grocery stores to restaurants.

These products aim to mimic meat in taste, texture, look and smell and the similarities are now quite impressive. The ingredients usually include a plant-based protein, such as soy or pea, and sometimes other beans, wheat, or potatoes.

Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two monster names in this space, but there are dozens of brands out there. In the fresh food aisles of grocery stores, plant-based options focus on ground beef, burger patties, meatballs, and sausage. Freezer aisles have that, as well as many products designed to replicate specific dishes, like chicken nuggets, pot pies, or stir-fries.

So, how to cook at home with these products?

“The vegetarian meat is an easy substitute,” says Angela Campbell, a pescetarian living in Portland, Maine, who relies on plant-based meats to enhance her cooking. She says she can use the ground beef and imitation sausage 1:1 in recipes.

They can be used in pasta sauces, stir-fries, casseroles, fajitas, etc.

Like ground beef, plant-based crumbles are perishable, so treat them like ground beef, use within a few days, and cook thoroughly.

Many of them cook faster than their meat counterparts and seem more sensitive to precise cooking times; the packages often warn against undercooking or overcooking. So you might want to add them towards the end of preparing a dish. Most brand websites offer recipes.

Campbell says she’s had less success with the “chicken” products.

“You can’t reproduce long-simmered chicken dishes or whole-breasted dishes,” she says. “The (plant-based) chicken generally tastes best in a pan or with a separately prepared sauce. The chicken may brown, but nothing will crisp up.”

Cheyenne Cohen, a food photographer based in Brooklyn, New York, follows a vegan diet at home and says, “When I use plant-based meat, I’m never trying to replicate a meat meal perfectly. I want to learn the texture and overall flavor of each brand/variety and then experiment with preparation and seasoning until I find something that works well.”

She loves using soy crumbles as taco meat or in any other way you’d normally use ground beef, and says it’s generally easy to make the swap.

Rather than placing the meat substitutes at the center of the dish, Cohen finds them “a good recipe ingredient,” just one component.

Jade Wong, owner of Red Bamboo in New York City, has been running restaurants specializing in plant-based meats for 20 years. She says her menu caters to vegetarians and vegans looking for comfort food.

“Do you really want a salad on a cold winter’s day? Or would you rather have a chicken parmesan hero or a burger?” says Wong.

Red Bamboo makes its own plant-based meat products (100% vegetarian and 100% vegan) and sells them wholesale to other restaurants. Wong notes that many store-bought plant-based meats are pre-cooked, so they just need to be heated.

She suggests marinating soy burger patties in your favorite marinade before quickly searing them on a griddle. And cooking soy-based meat substitutes on a ridged grill pan offers the appeal of traditional grilled meat dishes.

Crumbled “sausage,” says Wong, is great as a pizza topping or, when sautéed and mixed with vegetables, as an accompaniment to pasta dishes, perhaps along with sauce and condiments.

At the restaurant, they get more creative, offering options like grilled buffalo wings, which are soy-based “chicken” wrapped in tofu (they even stick a stick in the wings to mimic the bone).

Some plant-based products are like blank slates, destined to be used in your favorite recipes. Others are prepared in a heat-and-eat manner.

Gardein has a strong presence in the frozen food department, known for its “chik’n” products; They also make homemade beefless tips that you can skewer, sauté, or stir-fry, and pork-free sweet and sour bites. Before the Butcher makes seasoned, plant-based ground meat products and patties with interesting flavor profiles like roast turkey burgers. They also make a lower-priced line of burgers under the Mainstream name, which aims to compete with beef patties not only in taste but also in price.

Celebrity chef and restaurateur Ming Tsai recently launched a line of Ming’s Bings, a treat bonanza made from ground, plant-based meats, vegetables, cheese and assorted spices, encased in brown rice paper and crispy when baked.

Some plant-based meat products are vegan, some vegetarian, some gluten-free, some dairy-free; If you have feeding problems, read the packaging carefully.

___

Katie Workman writes regularly about food for The Associated Press. She has written two cookbooks that focus on family-friendly cooking, Dinner Solved!. and The Mama 100 Cookbook. She blogs at http://www.themom100.com/about-katie-workman. She can be reached at Katie@themom100.com.

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

Celebrating Veganuary: Heart-and planet-healthy eating

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To set the momentum for the coming months, it’s important to start talking about healthy eating right at the start of the year. And a portmanteau of January and vegan, Veganuary, a global pledge to adopt a plant-based lifestyle for 31 days, does the same. This global movement is an initiative by the UK-based charity of the same name to promote vegan diets for a better planet. The movement, which was officially launched in India in December 2019, has garnered widespread interest from people across the country. A recent survey by YouGov, a market research and data analytics firm, showed that 65% of Indians are interested in replacing meat with plant-based options in 2022.

Several brands have launched vegan menus to meet the demands. “There is no denying that the pandemic has made people more aware of the consequences of their lifestyle choices on their immunity, health, mental and physical well-being. Veganism is a long-term lifestyle and cannot be limited to just one January. To cater to this new trend, we have launched a plant-based chicken biryani,” says Mohammed Bhol, chef and co-founder of Charcoal Eats. Vegan meat is made from ingredients like plant-based protein, soy, or wheat, and has the flavor and texture of real meat. “Plant-based keema is made from soy. From the keema we make kofta balls. And these mock meatballs are used in the biryani,” adds Bhol.

Healthy Vegan Jackfruit Tacos (Photo: Shutterstock)

Vegan food is considered the cleanest of all diets and isn’t lacking in flavor or variety. Uday Malhotra, executive chef and co-founder of Kneed, a bakery that operates on a cloud kitchen model, says, “We make homemade breads, rolls, cereal, nut butters, dips, hummus, and energy bars that are 100% plant-based products. Veganism is one of the dominant trends of 2022.” However, vegan baking is time-consuming and technical in terms of temperature and ingredients used. “Because vegan products don’t use dairy or eggs, the recipes formulated are time and temperature sensitive,” adds Malhotra, who suggests using Belgian dark chocolate for chocolate bread and banneton baskets to shape gluten-free loaves.

Raw Vegan Blueberry Cashew Cake (Photo: Shutterstock)

Cakes are another food category that is in high demand for vegan options. For vegan cakes, you can substitute flaxseed, ripe bananas, or aquafaba for eggs. Instead of milk, use almond milk, coconut milk, or oat milk. “I suggest only using one substitute as too many of these will ruin the end product,” says Atifa Nazir Ahanger of The Boho Baker, which offers vegan cakes, cupcakes, breads and cookies. For those trying a vegan diet for the first time, it’s easier to start with substitutes like plant-based milk, nut butters like peanut butter, cashew butter, and cheese substitutes.

This movement has also seen vegan restaurants grow in popularity. “As a trend, Veganuary helps us support people in making the switch to a vegan diet. The right taste is the first step. Vegan food can be made equally tasty by appropriate swaps. We use coconut cream for our cream-based recipes. For Japanese soba noodles, we use gluten-free soba noodles, homemade peanut butter sauce, button mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms, spring onions, zucchini, galangal, soy sauce and coconut milk,” says Rajender Chabotra, Executive Chef at Getafix Café. The restaurant also offers buckwheat pancakes, barley and bok choi bowl meals, among other vegan options.

Cauliflower Moilee is a healthy vegan recipe

Cauliflower Moilee Recipe

ingredients

Cauliflower: 1

carrot: 1

Coconut Oil: 2 tbsp

Mustard seeds: 1 tsp

Curry leaves: 10-14

Onion: 2

Ginger: 1 inch

Garlic: 12-15 pieces

Tomatoes: 3

Beans: 8-10

Green chilies: 3 to 4

Chili power, turmeric powder and cumin powder: 1 tsp each

Tamarind pulp, coconut cream: ¼ cup

Coconut milk: 1 cup

method

Heat coconut oil, add mustard seeds, curry leaf and let it bubble.

Chop the onions, ginger and garlic in a blender and add the paste to the oil. Saute this for five to seven minutes.

Once the onion paste is light golden, add mashed tomatoes ground in a blender, whole green chillies, dry spices, turmeric powder, red chilli powder and cumin powder and salt to taste.

Cook this mixture until you see the oil separate.

Add the tamarind pulp, coconut milk and coconut cream and stir.

Blanch the carrot, cauliflower, and beans to add to the sauce.

Cook until boiling and serve hot with steamed rice or millet.

Recipe by chef Natasha Gandhi

  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Ruchika Garg writes about arts and culture for the daily supplement Entertainment & Lifestyle, HT City
    …see in detail

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

These recipes can make your winter snacks pop

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Looking for a tasty treat with a wide variety of flavors? Popcorn is a versatile pantry staple that can be served plain or as a better addition to your winter snacks.

With no artificial additives or preservatives, light and fluffy popcorn is naturally low in fat and calories, non-GMO, and gluten-free, making it a sensible option for satisfying cravings for something savory, sweet, and just about every flavor in between. Plus, whole grain popcorn contains energy-producing carbohydrates and fiber that can help keep you fuller for longer.

National Popcorn Day on Wednesday, January 19 honors one of America’s oldest and most beloved snack foods, so this week is a perfect opportunity to crack open a bowl to share or indulge in whole grain culinary masterpieces like Jamaican jerk popcorn create. with pepperoni, spices and jerk butter, plus furikake popcorn, a lighter recipe that explodes with the flavors of sesame, nori and a Japanese spice blend.

You can also pair some favorite movie night flavors with Cheesy Pepperoni Popcorn or Rocky Road Popcorn Clusters with Chocolate, Marshmallows, and Nuts.

Furikake popcorn

(Makes 2-3 servings)

• 6 cups of popcorn

• 2 tablespoons butter, melted

Furikake Seasoning:

• 1 sheet of nori, broken into pieces

• 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds, divided

• ½ teaspoon of salt

• ½ teaspoon of granulated sugar

How to Make the Furikake Seasoning: In a spice grinder or with a mortar and pestle, finely grind nori with ½ tablespoon sesame seeds. Transfer to a small bowl and stir in the remaining sesame seeds, salt, and sugar.

In a large bowl, toss popcorn with butter and furikake spices until evenly coated.

Tips: Use store-bought furikake seasoning and season to taste.

To toast sesame seeds: In a small, dry skillet, cook sesame seeds over medium-high heat for two to three minutes, or until lightly golden and fragrant. Allow to cool completely before use.

Jerk popcorn from Jamaica

(Makes 4-6 servings)

Jerk popcorn from Jamaica

(The popcorn board)

• ¼ cup butter

• 1 tablespoon chopped, seeded scotch bonnet chili pepper

• 1 teaspoon grated lime zest

• ½ teaspoon chili powder

• ½ teaspoon dried thyme

• ½ teaspoon ground allspice

• ½ teaspoon pepper

• ¼ teaspoon ground ginger

• 1/8 teaspoon garlic powder

• 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

• 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

• 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

• 1/8 teaspoon onion powder

• ¼ teaspoon salt

• 8 cups of popcorn

In a small saucepan, combine butter, chili pepper, lime zest, chili powder, thyme, allspice, pepper, ginger, garlic powder, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, onion powder, and salt. Cook over low heat for three to five minutes, or until butter melts and mixture is fragrant.

In a large bowl, toss the popcorn with the spice mixture until evenly coated.

Tip: If desired, omit the Scotch Bonnet pepper and substitute ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper.

Cheesy Pepperoni Popcorn

(Makes 6-8 1 cup servings)

Cheesy Pepperoni Popcorn

Cheesy Pepperoni Popcorn

(The popcorn board)

• ¼ cup low-fat parmesan cheese

• 2 teaspoons garlic powder

• ¼ teaspoon dried oregano

• ¼ teaspoon dried marjoram leaves

• ¼ teaspoon dried basil leaves

• 1/8 teaspoon dried sage

• Black pepper to taste

• 12 cups of air popped popcorn

• ¾ cup turkey peppers, cut into bite-sized pieces

• Olive oil cooking spray

In a small bowl, combine the Parmesan cheese, garlic powder, oregano, marjoram, basil, sage, and pepper and mix well.

In a large bowl, combine popcorn and turkey peppers and lightly spray with olive oil cooking spray.

Sprinkle the popcorn and pepperoni with the cheese mixture and distribute evenly.

Rocky Road Popcorn Cluster

(makes 3 dozen)

Rocky Road Popcorn Cluster

Rocky Road Popcorn Cluster

(The popcorn board)

• 1 bag (6 ounces) semi-sweet chocolate chips

• 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

• 4 cups of popcorn

• 1½ cups mini marshmallows

• ¾ cup chopped walnuts

In a small microwave-safe bowl, microwave the chocolate chips on high for 1 minute until melted. Stir in vegetable oil.

In a large bowl, add popcorn, marshmallows, and walnuts. Pour the melted chocolate over the mixture and toss to coat.

Drop the mixture, tablespoon at a time, onto a jelly roll pan lined with wax paper.

Refrigerate until set, about two hours, or overnight.

Visit popcorn.org for more fun, fluffy, and flavorful recipes. ◆

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