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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

A Beginner’s Guide to Eating (and Cooking) Eggs

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Bird eggs are often referred to as “nature’s multivitamin” and may be the perfect food. They have 12 grams (g) of protein and 10 g of fat (per 100 g of eggs) and contain more than 10 percent of the recommended daily allowance of several B vitamins as well as traces of calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, manganese, vitamin E and folic acid – pretty much everything a human body needs to function properly.

But beyond the health benefits, there are SO MANY reasons to love eggs. They’re easy to come by and damn cheap (a dozen for less than the price of a Starbucks frappuccino), they stay good in the fridge for a while, and you can turn them into hearty scrambled eggs, spicy shakshukas, poached toasters, and fried egg sammies in minutes .

Do you want to level? Eggs can also turn into vegetable-sprinkled frittata, cheesy quiches, egg salads, benedicts, burritos, and more. And that’s before we dive into egg-like sweets like cakes, cookies, pancakes, waffles, and meringues. Of all the foods in the world, eggs can do almost anything – breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert, and snacks!

Eggs may look simple on the surface, but a lot happens inside! If you’ve ever cracked an egg and asked yourself, “Is this ornate thing normal?” Then you are not alone. No matter what type of egg you eat (chicken, duck, quail, etc.), each egg is made up of the following parts:

  • Bowl. This hard but slightly porous outer coating protects the inner structures from damage and the outside world.
  • Thin egg white. This is the thin, slightly watery outer part of egg white (egg white is a combination of protein and water).
  • Thick egg whites. This is the high protein protein itself.
  • Chalaza. This tough thing found in raw eggs, the chalaza (also made from protein), binds the yolk of the egg to the shell. It looks disgusting, but very important!
  • Egg yolk. This is the high-cholesterol, yellow center of every bird’s egg, where vitamins and other nutrients are stored.
  • Germinal disc. This is the small, round, white spot on the surface of the yolk that, when fertilized, grows into a baby bird. Don’t worry – this is extremely unlikely with grocery store eggs.
  • Airbag. As it sounds, this is a small pocket of air trapped in the egg. If you are peeling hard-boiled eggs, this space will (usually) help you separate the shell from the whites.

The status quo of bird eggs, the most commonly consumed egg, is without a doubt the chicken egg.

Chickens live in every country in the world (except Vatican City) and can be found on every continent except Antarctica – there are roughly 20 billion chickens strutting and screeching around the world at all times. Given their numbers (and the important nutrients in their bowls), chances are everyone, apart from the world’s lifelong vegans, has eaten a chicken egg at some point.

The USDA recognizes six sizes or weight classes for chicken eggs: Peewee, Small, Medium, Large, Extra Large, and Jumbo. Size is determined by the weight per dozen, not the size or weight of each individual egg. The size of an egg depends on a number of factors, including the age and breed of the chicken. Hens in their prime typically lay medium and large eggs. The USDA also categorizes eggs based on quality.

Your local grocery store is the most likely to come across large, extra large, or sometimes jumbo eggs. Personally, I’ve never seen small chicken eggs for sale (all small eggs at most U.S. grocers are duck or quail eggs – more on that in a moment).

Hence, most of us use large or extra large eggs. (A recipe that calls for “two eggs” probably won’t work as planned with pee, small, or jumbo eggs.)

Since large chicken eggs are the most commonly used in cooking and baking, and because eggs are used in SO MANY different types of recipes, there are some very useful numbers and rules to know. What to do if your recipe calls for large eggs and you only have oversized or jumbo eggs on hand?

Boom – here’s the math:

  • 3 large eggs = 3 medium-sized eggs OR 3 extra-large eggs OR 2 jumbo eggs
  • 4 large eggs = 5 medium-sized eggs OR 4 extra-large eggs OR 3 jumbo eggs
  • 5 large eggs = 6 medium-sized eggs OR 4 extra-large eggs OR 4 jumbo eggs
  • 6 large eggs = 7 medium-sized eggs OR 5 extra-large eggs OR 5 jumbo eggs

Knowing the weight of a large egg white (1 ounce) can be very helpful if, for example, you’re making a protein-based recipe that requires 5 ounces of egg white (that’s the protein from 5 large eggs) or if you or someone you know and love (or socially tolerated), is strongly nutrition-oriented and needs to know how much fat and / or protein is in a dish.

Knowing that egg whites are cooked at a higher temperature (175 ° F / 80 ° C) than egg yolks (158 ° F / 70 ° C) can also help avoid nasty breakfast situations.

Chicken eggs aren’t the only ones offering these treats and benefits. Human beings can safely eat eight kinds of bird eggs. Chicken, duck, quail, goose, turkey, emu, ostrich, and pheasant eggs can all be fried, stirred, or hard-boiled; used in cakes, cookies and pies; or even shaken in a cocktail, though I hope that when you are working with ostrich eggs you are not eating – or drinking – alone.

  • Duck eggs. Duck eggs are about 50 percent larger and weigh more than chicken eggs because of their higher fat content. They’re great for baking – those extra ounces of fat equates to fluffier cakes, richer breads, and more gravity-defying meringues.
  • Quail eggs. These eggs are about half the size of a large hen’s egg and are light beige in color with dark brown spots. Quail eggs are a particularly popular street food product in the Philippines, where dozens of oranges whipped and fried eggs called kwek kwek are sold to passers-by.
  • Turkey eggs. While completely edible, turkey eggs don’t often make it to markets or stores. Adult turkeys are more valuable to farmers, and they need these eggs to hatch into someone’s main course for Thanksgiving.
  • Goose eggs. If you can find a goose egg in the wild or on a menu, it’s about twice the size of a hen’s egg and much denser when cooked due to the thick egg yolks and high protein content. Goose egg yolk is very popular with pasta manufacturers and is attributed to the production of the perfectly structured pasta.
  • Pheasant Eggs. Pheasants lay eggs that are twice the size of quail eggs. These eggs have olive or brown shells and are widely used in egg dishes in the UK
  • Ostrich eggs. Ostrich eggs are the largest edible bird eggs, weighing around 3 pounds each. They have a liquid egg yolk similar to that of chicken eggs, so they can be fried or stirred – if you can open them up.
  • Emu eggs. The deep blue-green color of emu eggs makes them look like something from space, but they are edible. They are lighter than ostrich eggs, but very different inside. Their fat content is so high that when you open them, even raw, you have to wiggle a little to get the sticky inside out of the shell.

Bird eggs in numbers

If you’re feeling really adventurous (or stranded in the woods or the Australian bush), here’s how other types of bird eggs compare to the kitchen gold standard of the large hen’s egg.

Haley Hamilton is a Boston-based bartender and freelance writer with words in EATER; Hustle and bustle; MEL magazine; Catapult magazine; Boston’s alternative weekly DigBoston; and elsewhere.

Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Make your next barbecue a healthy one

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Summer tends to mean more outdoor dining options. Whether you are hosting a meal event, packing a picnic, participating in a social activity and bringing food, or just preparing a meal for the family, why not consider some delicious options that also promote better health.

Typical grilled dishes often contain processed and / or high fat meats, lots of refined starches, foods high in sodium, desserts and beverages with added sugar, snacks that are high in calories but low in nutrients, and with a minimal amount of fruits and vegetables. These can be detrimental to health, especially if consumed frequently.

In considering some outdoor eating goals, in addition to improving the quality of the food on offer, it is essential that the food be kept at a safe temperature. This means the provision of cold rooms (< 40 degrees) or keeping hot foods hot (> 140 degrees) until the time of consumption. This goal is not only intended for protein foods such as meat, but also for other products. All food has the potential to harbor microbes that grow in this temperature range and can potentially lead to disease.

The way food is grilled also has an impact on food safety. Indirect cooking is a better plan than direct heat, which leads to char. Marinating can also reduce the production of substances that are created during grilling that can otherwise contribute to health problems.

When deciding what to prepare, think about ingredients that fit a healthy profile. This means lean, less processed meat, skinless poultry, fish, seafood, vegetable proteins such as beans, lentils, nuts, seeds, soy products, a strong emphasis on fruits and vegetables, minimal amounts of added sugar. Sodium, saturated fat, and the use of whole instead of refined grains.

The taste of food can be enhanced with fresh herbs, unsalted spices and rubs, homemade dressings with various vinegars, mustard, olive oil, lemon or lime juice or peel, and fresh or roasted onions, garlic, spring onions and shallots. Pesto or a light rubbing of strong cheese like parmesan can add flavor to foods like a cold pasta salad.

For snacking, baked whole grain or bean chips and various raw vegetables with salsa, guacamole, hummus or other bean dip are good choices. Popcorn (without a lot of butter or salt) is always a hit. How about a trail mix made from nuts, whole grains and some dried fruit?

As a starter, you can serve bite-sized pieces of wholemeal bread spread with pesto or herb goat cheese with halved grape tomatoes and fresh basil. You can cut across slices of Thai salad wraps or a whole grain wrap with healthy fillings. A cold fruit soup with berries, peaches, mango or other fruits and yogurt can be served in small cups. Fruit skewers on small wooden skewers look colorful. How about a thick slice of heirloom tomato with a devilish egg or a caprese salad made from tomatoes, mozzarella and fresh basil – both sprinkled with balsamic vinegar.

As a main course, some protein items can be served alone with side dishes or incorporated into other dishes. For example, grilled fish is great in a fish taco. Kabobs make a wide variety of vegetables possible. Grilled chicken or shrimp can be the protein in a meal with vegetables and cooked whole grains. Plant-based proteins like beans, lentils, nuts, and seeds work well in a variety of salads and cereal dishes. Veggie burgers or marinated tofu are some of the plant-based main dishes.

A grill basket is a practical grill accessory. It can be used to grill vegetables or to sear them on the grill. An example would be to marinate raw chicken in olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and garlic, then stir frequently with bite-sized vegetables (peppers, onions, zucchini, summer squash, mushrooms, etc.) and grill until all the ingredients are cooked through.

With the side dishes, the possibilities are almost unlimited. In addition to the summer favorite, corn on the cob, there are numerous salads and mixed varieties. A refreshing side dish would be a bowl of fresh fruit with mint leaves or a dash of balsamic vinegar.

Grilled vegetables, especially when seasoned, can provide unique flavors as a stand-alone product or can be added to mixed dishes. Spices can be as varied as vinegar or lemon juice with olive oil, a lime / caraway / olive oil dressing, a pinch of roasted nuts or seeds, a lightly grated Parmesan cheese, chopped fresh herbs (such as basil, dill or coriander), or a dressing with curry spice. These spices can also be used on a fresh lettuce with various vegetables or as a substitute for mayonnaise in coleslaw.

A delicious salad can be prepared from steamed corn on the cob, halved grape tomatoes, diced mozzarella balls, chopped avocado, chopped fresh herbs (basil, oregano, parsley) and a lemon / olive oil dressing. You can add other proteins to this dish, such as chicken, shrimp or edamame and / or dark leafy vegetables.

One-dish meals can be based on a cooked whole grain such as brown rice, quinoa, whole wheat pasta, farro or wheat berries. For more flavor, you can cook these in low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth. Add any number of options to the grain, such as: B. grilled, roasted or raw vegetables, raw / sautéed / roasted onions (spring onions, red or white onions, garlic or shallots), dried or fresh fruits and one or more protein products (poultry, fish or other seafood, lean meat, low-fat cheese , Beans, lentils, tofu, edamame, nuts, seeds). Add some chopped fresh herbs and a dash of vinaigrette.

When it comes to drinks, think of options with minimal added sugar. This can be water, flavored water, or water with added fruit slices. How about a “Make your own smoothie” station? Offer a variety of fruits, leafy greens, fresh mint, yogurt, milk or soy milk, and maybe some spices like cinnamon.

For a healthy dessert who doesn’t like the summer favorite – watermelon!

So, with a little creativity and planning, you can offer delicious and healthy summer dishes for friends and family at your next summer dinner or dinner event.

Pam Stuppy

Pam Stuppy, MS, RD, LD is a registered, licensed nutritionist with nutritional advice offices in York, ME and Portsmouth, NH. She has also been a nutritionist for Phillips Exeter Academy, holding workshops nationwide, and providing advice on sports nutrition. (See www.pamstuppynutrition.com for more nutritional information, some healthy cooking tips and recipe ideas).

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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Everything you ever wanted to know about gluten-free

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Gluten has become a popular topic, and there is a lot of confusion as to whether going gluten-free is a legitimate pursuit or just an unfounded fad.

Let’s clear it up. Here’s what it is, why it may be necessary to remove it from your diet, and the typical pitfalls to avoid when opting for a gluten-free diet.

What is gluten

It’s a type of protein naturally found in wheat (including spelled, kamut, farro, and bulgur), barley, rye, and triticale. However, as an additive, it acts like a binder that holds food together, so you can find it in products that range from salad dressings to vitamins; it can even be in lip balm.

Is it bad for you

There are legitimate medical conditions that make people intolerant to gluten. The most common is celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in which eating gluten causes damage to the small intestine (more on this below).

Some people believe that it is harmful to everyone and should be avoided across the board. So far, there isn’t a lot of research to support this. A 2017 study published in the BMJ followed over 100,000 people without celiac disease for 26 years. The researchers found no link between long-term consumption of gluten through food and the risk of heart disease, a concern that people in and outside of the medical community had.

Gluten-free and high-carbohydrate foods
Gluten-free and high-carbohydrate foods, including sweet potatoes and fruits, are nutritious and healthy. (Photo credit: Louis Hansel / Unsplash)

Another study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology in 2019 looked at over 160,000 women without celiac disease. The scientists concluded that dietary gluten intake in adulthood was not linked to a risk of microscopic colitis, also known as inflammation of the colon lining, which was another potential problem.

Still, some people want to avoid it even if they don’t have a disease that causes gluten intolerance. As a nutritionist, I agree that a customer can become gluten-free as long as they consume a variety of nutritious whole-food sources of carbohydrates. In short, you don’t need gluten, but you do need a wide range of nutrients and energy-supporting carbohydrates that are easily obtained while avoiding gluten.

Why do people go on a gluten-free diet?

Gluten is found in many foods, so killing it entirely can be a huge obligation, but there are medical conditions that call for strict gluten avoidance. Here, too, someone with celiac disease has to eliminate them completely from their diet. This is because even consuming small amounts of gluten can trigger serious symptoms such as abdominal pain and gas. However, celiac disease isn’t the only condition that warrants a gluten-free diet. Some doctors recommend that people with other autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, psoriasis, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis avoid gluten.

There is also gluten sensitivity without celiac disease. In people with this condition, eating gluten causes bothersome side effects due to an inflammatory reaction. Symptoms can include flu-like feelings, gas and other gastrointestinal problems, mental foggy, and tiredness. The remedy is to avoid gluten.

(Photo: Pille R. Priske / Unsplash)

Another condition, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), is a skin rash that results from eating gluten. While people with celiac disease can also have DH, you can have DH without being diagnosed with celiac disease.

Finally, if you have a wheat allergy, you need to avoid some sources of gluten. Sometimes mistakenly referred to as an allergy, a wheat allergy can lead to a serious reaction to any of the proteins found in wheat, including gluten. Wheat must be avoided if you have a wheat allergy, but you may not need to cut out non-wheat grains that contain gluten. Swelling or itching in the mouth or throat, hives, shortness of breath, gastrointestinal problems and, in severe cases, anaphylaxis are possible symptoms of a wheat allergy.

Even for people without any of these conditions, eliminating gluten can improve health, energy, and weight management – but only if it means replacing highly processed foods that traditionally contain gluten with whole, naturally gluten-free foods. For example, if switching to gluten results in a change, such as replacing a dense bagel of refined white flour with a bowl of oatmeal with fruit and nuts, you may see benefits even if your body isn’t specifically gluten-sensitive.

Is it healthy?

Gluten-free foods can be healthy, but they can also be highly processed and lacking in nutrients. Whole grain gluten-free products like brown rice and quinoa are full of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber, and have research-backed health benefits. Other naturally gluten-free, high-carbohydrate foods such as sweet potatoes and fruit are also nutritious and healthy.

Unfortunately, the gluten-free craze has sparked a boom in highly processed foods made with refined versions of gluten-free grains like white rice. From pizza crusts to cupcakes, you can buy practically anything in a gluten-free version these days. The fact that a product is gluten-free doesn’t automatically make it healthy; it just makes it acceptable to someone who needs or wants to avoid gluten.

In my practice, I’ve seen people gain weight after becoming gluten-free from eating too much processed gluten-free foods like muffins, donuts, crackers, bread, and cookies. If diet is your priority, check out the ingredients list. Unless it’s an occasional treat, a product’s ingredients should read like a recipe you might have made in your own kitchen. And if grains are included (some gluten-free products are made with other starches like potatoes or cassava) they should be whole (like brown or white rice), which means they haven’t been stripped of their fiber and nutrients. In other words, there are packaged gluten-free foods that are healthy, like chickpea noodles, but you need to look beyond “gluten-free” on a package to isolate it.

Beware of the myths

Since going gluten-free became mainstream, I’ve heard a lot of myths about this protein, and I’ve seen some common gluten-free missteps. For example, I’ve met a lot of people who say they’re gluten-free, but in reality they’ve only eliminated wheat-based foods like bread, pasta, and bagels. As mentioned earlier, wheat is just a source of gluten.

Some people also think that gluten is found in all types of grain. In fact, there are several naturally gluten-free grains, including rice, corn, quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, teff, and oats – that is, as long as they have not been contaminated with other gluten-containing grains during processing. (Note: this is the reason why some oatmeal is specifically labeled gluten-free. It is not a different type of oat, and the gluten has not been removed; it simply has not been brought into contact with it.) Some people also believe that all of them contain high-carb foods Gluten, which causes them to eliminate carbohydrate-free foods like potatoes or even fruits. The truth is, most whole foods are naturally gluten-free, with the exception of a handful of grains.

Bottom line

Going gluten-free shouldn’t be dismissed as a trend. Some people don’t have to do anything to feel good. Others may choose to avoid it because it will help them make healthier choices, like snacking on fruits and nuts instead of pretzels. If you choose to go gluten-free, be sure to avoid some of the pitfalls mentioned. And if you need more personal advice on how to meet your nutritional needs on a gluten-free diet or how to treat a chronic condition, contact a registered nutritionist who can advise you individually.

Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, is the nutrition editor for Health, a New York Times best-selling author, and a private performance nutritionist who has advised five professional sports teams.

This story first appeared on www.health.com

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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Your New Go-To For a Meatless Meal

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UT Extension County Director Elizabeth Sanders made garden vegetable lasagna. UT Extension’s Department of Family and Consumer Sciences offers research-based education across Tennessee to help families select and prepare foods that result in healthy eating habits, as well as the safe preservation and handling of food. To learn more about these resources and the programs available in your community, contact your County Extension Office. Further information can be found at https://fcs.tennessee.edu/food/.

1. CHOOSE VEGETABLES

Choose a combination of two vegetables (when cooked they should make about 4 cups) Examples of vegetable combinations: asparagus and mushrooms, spinach and zucchini, broccoli and carrots, eggplant and peppers, eggplants and onions.

PREPARE VEGETABLES

Cook vegetables before assembling lasagna. Use the cooking method that is appropriate for the type of vegetable you have chosen.

1 pound of firm, hard vegetables steam-sautéed

Boil in 1/3 cup water with 2 cloves of garlic, chopped; 2 teaspoons of butter or olive oil; and 1/2 teaspoon salt until the water has evaporated.

Asparagus – Cut thin spears of asparagus and cut them into 1-inch pieces (if asparagus is thick, cut it in half lengthwise before slicing it into pieces).

Broccoli – cut florets, peel and slice stems, cut into 1/4 inch thick slices.

Carrots – peel and cut into 1/4 inch slices.

Cauliflower – cut into medium-sized florets.

1 pound of tender vegetables sautéed

Heat a tablespoon of olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. When the oil begins to shimmer, add the vegetables and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables are soft and the liquid evaporates, 5 – 7 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook for about 15-20 seconds until it is fragrant.

Bell Peppers * – yellow or red bell peppers, pitted, pitted, and cut into 1/4 inch strips.

Mushrooms – rinsed and sliced.

Onions – red, yellow or white, halved and thinly sliced.

Spinach – washed and cleaned

1 pound of tender vegetables, grilled

Set the oven rack to the highest position and preheat the grill. Brush both sides of the vegetables lightly with oil and sprinkle with salt. Grilling, turning once until brown spots appear on each side, 7-10 minutes. Sprinkle hot vegetables with garlic, toss gently and set aside until assembly.

Eggplant – trimmed and cut into 1/3-inch-thick rounds.

Zucchini – trimmed and cut into 1/3-inch-thick rounds.

Yellow Pumpkin – trimmed and cut into 1/3-inch-thick rounds.

* Roasted peppers have a sweeter, more intense taste than sautéed peppers. To roast in the oven, heat the grill to high and place a rack in the top third of the oven. Place the peppers directly on the wire rack. Roast for about 20 minutes, turning occasionally until they turn black and form bubbles on all sides. Let cool in a bowl covered with plastic wrap. If you have a gas stove, turn a burner on the highest setting and place your pepper directly on the flame. Use tongs to twist the peppers until the skin is completely blackened. After the peppers have cooled down, peel off the skin and seeds and cut into thin strips.

2. THE SAUCE

White sauce with parmesan flavor

ingredients

2 1/2 cups of low-fat or fat-free milk

1 cup fresh or canned low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth

6 garlic gloves, chopped

3 tablespoons of butter

5 tablespoons of all-purpose flour

1/2 cup of grated parmesan cheese

1/4 teaspoon salt of ground black pepper

Directions

In a 1 liter microwave-safe container, heat the milk, stock and garlic on high power until steaming hot, about 8 minutes. Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. When it’s melted, stir in the flour and continue to cook, stirring constantly, until well blended. Pour in the hot milk mixture at once and stir vigorously until the sauce is smooth and begins to bubble and thicken. Stir in the parmesan and season with 1/4 teaspoon salt and pepper. Remove from heat and cover.

Red sauce

ingredients

3 tablespoons of butter

2 medium onions, halved and thinly sliced

2 cloves of garlic, chopped

1/4 teaspoon dried basil

1 can of mashed tomatoes (28 ounces)

1 can of diced tomatoes (14-1 / 2 ounces)

Salt (optional) and ground black pepper

Preparation Heat the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onions and cook, stirring frequently, until soft and golden brown, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and basil and cook for about 30 seconds longer until it is fragrant. Stir in tomatoes; Rinse cans with about 1/4 cup of water and add to saucepan. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes to mix the flavors. Season to taste with salt (optional) and pepper.

3. THE PASTA

Prepare 12 lasagne noodles according to the manufacturer’s instructions. When cooking lasagna noodles, they are best when undercooked. When baking the lasagna, the pasta absorbs moisture from the ingredients. Whole wheat or mixed noodles provide more fiber and nutrients and tend to be more filling than refined noodles.

4. THE CHEESE

For lasagna with white sauce: 2-1 / 2 cups of partially skimmed mozzarella, fontina or provolone, 3/4 cup of grated parmesan. For lasagna with red sauce: 1-1 / 2 cups ricotta cheese (if grainy, use a food processor for smoothing) 2-1 / 2 cups partially skimmed mozzarella cheese, grated 3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese.

5. ASSEMBLY

For white sauce lasagna: Spread 1/4 cup sauce on the bottom of a 13×9 inch baking pan. Layer with 3 lasagne noodles, 2/3 cup sauce, half of a cooked vegetable (alternating layers of each variety), 1/2 cup of grated cheese, and 2 tablespoons of parmesan. Repeat 3 more times. For red sauce lasagna: Spread 1/4 cup sauce on the bottom of a 13×9 inch baking pan. Layer with 3 lasagna noodles, 6 tablespoons of ricotta cheese spread over the pasta, 2/3 cup of sauce, half of one of the cooked vegetables (alternating layers of each variety), 3/4 cup of mozzarella and 2 tablespoons of parmesan. Repeat 3 more times.

6. BAKE

Seal lasagna with foil and bake at 350 ° F for 35 or 40 minutes until bubbly.

7. FREEZE SOME FOR LATER

When you freeze prepared food, chill the food quickly and then pack it in wide-mouth rigid containers or foil-lined casserole dishes in the quantities you will be using at one time. Leave some head space for the food to expand.

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