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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Weight loss: Add more locally produced fruit & veg to your diet

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It is common knowledge that eating more fruits and vegetables is good for you and can help you lose weight. It is even better to eat locally grown foods rather than buying those that have been transported to the UK from other countries, especially since they are tastier and contain more nutrients.

In addition, British strawberries are even bigger and juicier this year as they gradually bloom and ripen.

This was due to a cooler winter and spring in the UK.

Nick Marston, chairman of the strawberry supplier British Summer Fruits, said: “This year strawberries have developed a little slower than usual.

“The cooler weather of recent times has resulted in delicious, but also larger and juicier British strawberries than in previous years.

“We are pleased that we can offer customers these locally grown fresh berries for a larger part of the year thanks to our continuously developed cultivation techniques, such as large-scale greenhouse production to extend the season.”

DO NOT MISS:

Dr. Emma Derbyshire is a public health nutritionist and advisor to British Summer Fruits.

She spoke exclusively to Express.co.uk about the benefits of consuming locally grown fruit and how to add more fruits and vegetables, as well as other healthier foods, to your diet.

Dr. Derbyshire said, “There are some simple ways that healthier foods can be included in meals.

“Sprinkle seeds or berries such as muesli, porridge or natural yogurt on your breakfast bowl. Eating raw vegetables between meals is another.

“Snacks like cookies, sweets, cakes and chocolate can also be swapped out and replaced with low-calorie, nutrient-dense foods like berries, melons, chopped vegetables and rice cakes or toast with hummus or vegetable spreads.

“Within the concept of ‘diet’ we also have to think about what we are drinking.

“Water is always a good first choice. Excess energy from sugary drinks can easily sneak in and add up – so it is also worth monitoring them. “

Dr. Derbyshire went on to explain the benefits of berries and why you should consider adding more to your diet.

She said, “Berries are considered beneficial to health. This is often due to their vitamin profiles and biologically active compounds.

“Not only are they delicious and naturally sweet, but they also contain vitamin C, vitamin K, manganese, copper, folic acid and fiber.

“Berries also contain antioxidants that help counteract free radicals and oxidants. These are unstable molecules that can be harmful if they damage the cells too much. “

Dr. Derbyshire added that berries could help weight loss because they “provide filling fiber so we should be eating less”.

The nutritionist added, “A study recently published in the Nutrients Journal showed that increased intake of fruits and vegetables was a major contributor to weight loss in women.

“This effect was further amplified when energy-dense or high-fat foods were also limited.”

Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

Your New Go-To For a Meatless Meal

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UT Extension County Director Elizabeth Sanders made garden vegetable lasagna. UT Extension’s Department of Family and Consumer Sciences offers research-based education across Tennessee to help families select and prepare foods that result in healthy eating habits, as well as the safe preservation and handling of food. To learn more about these resources and the programs available in your community, contact your County Extension Office. Further information can be found at https://fcs.tennessee.edu/food/.

1. CHOOSE VEGETABLES

Choose a combination of two vegetables (when cooked they should make about 4 cups) Examples of vegetable combinations: asparagus and mushrooms, spinach and zucchini, broccoli and carrots, eggplant and peppers, eggplants and onions.

PREPARE VEGETABLES

Cook vegetables before assembling lasagna. Use the cooking method that is appropriate for the type of vegetable you have chosen.

1 pound of firm, hard vegetables steam-sautéed

Boil in 1/3 cup water with 2 cloves of garlic, chopped; 2 teaspoons of butter or olive oil; and 1/2 teaspoon salt until the water has evaporated.

Asparagus – Cut thin spears of asparagus and cut them into 1-inch pieces (if asparagus is thick, cut it in half lengthwise before slicing it into pieces).

Broccoli – cut florets, peel and slice stems, cut into 1/4 inch thick slices.

Carrots – peel and cut into 1/4 inch slices.

Cauliflower – cut into medium-sized florets.

1 pound of tender vegetables sautéed

Heat a tablespoon of olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. When the oil begins to shimmer, add the vegetables and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables are soft and the liquid evaporates, 5 – 7 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook for about 15-20 seconds until it is fragrant.

Bell Peppers * – yellow or red bell peppers, pitted, pitted, and cut into 1/4 inch strips.

Mushrooms – rinsed and sliced.

Onions – red, yellow or white, halved and thinly sliced.

Spinach – washed and cleaned

1 pound of tender vegetables, grilled

Set the oven rack to the highest position and preheat the grill. Brush both sides of the vegetables lightly with oil and sprinkle with salt. Grilling, turning once until brown spots appear on each side, 7-10 minutes. Sprinkle hot vegetables with garlic, toss gently and set aside until assembly.

Eggplant – trimmed and cut into 1/3-inch-thick rounds.

Zucchini – trimmed and cut into 1/3-inch-thick rounds.

Yellow Pumpkin – trimmed and cut into 1/3-inch-thick rounds.

* Roasted peppers have a sweeter, more intense taste than sautéed peppers. To roast in the oven, heat the grill to high and place a rack in the top third of the oven. Place the peppers directly on the wire rack. Roast for about 20 minutes, turning occasionally until they turn black and form bubbles on all sides. Let cool in a bowl covered with plastic wrap. If you have a gas stove, turn a burner on the highest setting and place your pepper directly on the flame. Use tongs to twist the peppers until the skin is completely blackened. After the peppers have cooled down, peel off the skin and seeds and cut into thin strips.

2. THE SAUCE

White sauce with parmesan flavor

ingredients

2 1/2 cups of low-fat or fat-free milk

1 cup fresh or canned low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth

6 garlic gloves, chopped

3 tablespoons of butter

5 tablespoons of all-purpose flour

1/2 cup of grated parmesan cheese

1/4 teaspoon salt of ground black pepper

Directions

In a 1 liter microwave-safe container, heat the milk, stock and garlic on high power until steaming hot, about 8 minutes. Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. When it’s melted, stir in the flour and continue to cook, stirring constantly, until well blended. Pour in the hot milk mixture at once and stir vigorously until the sauce is smooth and begins to bubble and thicken. Stir in the parmesan and season with 1/4 teaspoon salt and pepper. Remove from heat and cover.

Red sauce

ingredients

3 tablespoons of butter

2 medium onions, halved and thinly sliced

2 cloves of garlic, chopped

1/4 teaspoon dried basil

1 can of mashed tomatoes (28 ounces)

1 can of diced tomatoes (14-1 / 2 ounces)

Salt (optional) and ground black pepper

Preparation Heat the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onions and cook, stirring frequently, until soft and golden brown, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and basil and cook for about 30 seconds longer until it is fragrant. Stir in tomatoes; Rinse cans with about 1/4 cup of water and add to saucepan. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes to mix the flavors. Season to taste with salt (optional) and pepper.

3. THE PASTA

Prepare 12 lasagne noodles according to the manufacturer’s instructions. When cooking lasagna noodles, they are best when undercooked. When baking the lasagna, the pasta absorbs moisture from the ingredients. Whole wheat or mixed noodles provide more fiber and nutrients and tend to be more filling than refined noodles.

4. THE CHEESE

For lasagna with white sauce: 2-1 / 2 cups of partially skimmed mozzarella, fontina or provolone, 3/4 cup of grated parmesan. For lasagna with red sauce: 1-1 / 2 cups ricotta cheese (if grainy, use a food processor for smoothing) 2-1 / 2 cups partially skimmed mozzarella cheese, grated 3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese.

5. ASSEMBLY

For white sauce lasagna: Spread 1/4 cup sauce on the bottom of a 13×9 inch baking pan. Layer with 3 lasagne noodles, 2/3 cup sauce, half of a cooked vegetable (alternating layers of each variety), 1/2 cup of grated cheese, and 2 tablespoons of parmesan. Repeat 3 more times. For red sauce lasagna: Spread 1/4 cup sauce on the bottom of a 13×9 inch baking pan. Layer with 3 lasagna noodles, 6 tablespoons of ricotta cheese spread over the pasta, 2/3 cup of sauce, half of one of the cooked vegetables (alternating layers of each variety), 3/4 cup of mozzarella and 2 tablespoons of parmesan. Repeat 3 more times.

6. BAKE

Seal lasagna with foil and bake at 350 ° F for 35 or 40 minutes until bubbly.

7. FREEZE SOME FOR LATER

When you freeze prepared food, chill the food quickly and then pack it in wide-mouth rigid containers or foil-lined casserole dishes in the quantities you will be using at one time. Leave some head space for the food to expand.

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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

More whole grains in the diet could save Australia billions | Queensland Country Life

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Smaller dietary changes with more whole grain products could significantly improve health and save billions in healthcare costs, says the managing director of the Nutrition Council for Grains and Legumes, Sara Grafenauer.

ONLY small dietary changes that would make Australians eat more whole grains could significantly reduce the incidence of heart disease and diabetes and lead to massive savings in our healthcare system.

Research by the Grains and Legumes Nutrition Council (GLNC) published last week in the international journal Nutrients found that swapping just three servings of processed grain foods a day for whole grains could save a staggering $ 1.4 billion annually.

These savings result from lower costs of treating heart disease and type 2 diabetes and a reduction in productivity losses due to illness.

The GLNC research, conducted in collaboration with an expert from the University of Kuwait, is the first study to quantify the health care savings associated with meeting the recommended daily intake for whole grains in Australia.

And the researchers believe the results have a significant impact on policy makers and could provide strong evidence that the messages regarding whole grains in national dietary guidelines are further strengthened.

Sara Grafenauer, managing director of GLNC, said conditions such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes are major health problems in

modern Australia and that increasing whole grain consumption would play a big role in reducing the incidence of these deadly conditions.

“Eating three servings of whole grains a day is known to reduce the risk of heart disease by 13 percent and type 2 diabetes by 32 percent,” said Dr. Grafenauer.

She said there is a lot of room for improvement in terms of increasing whole grain consumption in Australia.

The latest data shows that only 27 percent of Australians achieve the Recommended Daily Target Intake (DTI) of 48g per day.

The average whole grain consumption was 21 grams per day, which left a 27 grams per day gap.

“Knowing that a diet low in whole grains is the second leading risk factor for disease and death in Australia, the results of this study underscore the need for a change in diet,” she said.

“If 50 percent meet the DTI, it could save $ 734 million and more than $ 1.4 billion if 100 percent of Australians could achieve that goal,” said Dr. Grafenauer.

On the positive side, it is not difficult to stimulate the consumption of whole grain products.

“Three whole grain servings can be easily achieved by swapping out grain foods rather than increasing the energy density of the diet,” she said.

Breakfast is an important opportunity for change.

“By focusing on whole grain breakfast cereals and whole grain breads – the two largest sources of whole grains for Australians – the target levels for whole grains could be reached with minimal change in normal eating habits,” said Dr. Grafenauer.

“Simply switching to a whole grain option could have a profound impact on individual health as well as the Australian economy.”

There are a number of products that the GLNC recommends that consumers switch to whole grains, including bread, cereals, rice, noodles, noodles, polenta, couscous, crackers, oats, quinoa and barley.

Dr. Grafenauer said the next week would be a perfect time for consumers to start switching to more whole grains in their diet as this was whole grain week.

“There are a number of resources available to encourage increased whole grain consumption, including a video showing how refined grains are swapped for whole grains, an e-book with easy-to-prepare whole grain recipes, and searchable whole grain product data,” she said.

The Story More Whole Grains in the Diet Could Save Australia Billions, first appeared on Farm Online.

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Whole Grain Pasta Nutrients

5 Benefits of Sunflower Seeds and How to Eat Them

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Sunflowers aren’t just great backgrounds for Instagram photos. They also grow something tasty and nutritious: sunflower seeds.

Here are the biggest perks of this little snack.

Chewing sunflower seeds can’t just benefit your taste buds. Here are some ways adding sunflower seeds to your diet can benefit your health.

1. Good for your heart

Sunflower seeds are rich in nutrients that your heart loves. These include fiber, vitamins, healthy fats and minerals. Research suggests that a diet high in seeds can help keep your heart healthy and protect against heart disease.

Also, snacking on sunflower seeds can help keep cholesterol and blood pressure levels under control. A 2012 study of 22 women with type 2 diabetes found that consuming 30 grams of sunflower seeds per day for 3 weeks helped significantly lower “bad” LDL cholesterol and blood pressure.

2. Rich in antioxidants

Sunflower seeds are full of compounds (like antioxidants) that help keep your body healthy.

These tiny seeds contain a variety of antioxidant compounds, including chlorogenic acid, vitamin E, and more. Antioxidants help protect your cells from damage that can lead to disease.

Diets high in antioxidants are associated with lower risk of chronic disease. For example, a 2018 review of 69 studies found that higher blood levels and higher dietary intake of vitamin E were linked to lower risk of cancer, stroke, and all-cause death. That means it can even help you live longer.

3. May help promote healthy blood sugar levels

Eating a balanced, nutrient-rich diet is one of the best ways to keep your blood sugar levels at healthy levels.

Some nutrients (such as protein, fiber, and magnesium) are particularly important for blood sugar regulation. Sunflower seeds are a great source of these nutrients and a healthy choice for peeps with and without diabetes.

Sprinkle sunflower seeds over a green salad or combine sunflower seed butter with apple slices for a blood sugar-friendly snack.

4. Rich in minerals

Sunflower seeds are packed with important minerals like magnesium, zinc, copper, and selenium. It is important to make sure that you are getting enough mineral-rich foods in your diet as these nutrients do a lot for your body.

Zinc, for example, is important for a healthy immune response. Do you want well-functioning antioxidant enzymes? (Tip: Yes you do.) Selenium is essential. Magnesium is a superstar mineral that is essential for a healthy stress response, blood sugar regulation, and more.

Adding foods rich in minerals like sunflower seeds to your diet can help ensure that you are getting the recommended amount of these nutrients in the registry.

5. Practical and filling snack

Sunflower seeds are portable and, thanks to their high levels of protein, fat, and fiber, are super filling. That said, they’re a clever snack when you’re on the run.

Protein is the most filling macronutrient, and sunflower seeds provide 5.4 grams per ounce, which is pretty good for a plant-based source of protein. They also contain fiber and healthy fats, which makes them a well-balanced snack.

Try keeping a pack of sunflower seeds in your bag or backpack so you have a healthy option when hunger strikes.

Although they are tiny, sunflower seeds are loaded with nutrients. Even a small serving can have a big impact on your nutrient intake.

Here is the nutritional breakdown for one pack (50 grams) of plain, salted sunflower seeds.

  • Calories: 288
  • Protein: 9.55 grams (g)
  • Fat: 24.6 g
  • Carbohydrates: 11.9 g
  • Fiber: 5.5 g
  • Vitamin E: 12.0 milligrams (mg)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.397 mg
  • Magnesium: 63.5 mg
  • Phosphorus: 570 mg
  • Zinc: 2.62 mg
  • Copper: 0.904 mg
  • Folate: 117 micrograms (mcg)
  • Selenium: 39.2 mcg

Sunflower seeds are a good source of many vitamins and minerals. They are particularly rich in vitamin E, folic acid, phosphorus, copper, manganese and selenium.

Vitamin E actually refers to a group of nutrients that play many important roles in the body. They act as a powerful antioxidant and protect cells from damage. These nutrients are also involved in immune function, cellular signaling, and more.

Selenium is another mineral that is concentrated in sunflower seeds and acts as an antioxidant. It is also needed for thyroid function and reproductive health.

Zinc, copper, magnesium, phosphorus and manganese are required for healthy bones and immune function. The B vitamins folate and B6 are essential for metabolism, enzymatic reactions and other important processes.

Sunflower seeds also provide protein, healthy fats and fiber. What more could you want from a delicious snack food?

You can buy sunflower seeds raw or roasted. They come in pits (for peeps who like instant gratification) or in their shells (for those who like a challenge).

Both forms work well as a snack. However, if you’re using sunflower seeds in recipes, topping salads, or mixing with other ingredients to create a delicious student mix, it’s better to buy the unpeeled version.

Remember that peeled or unpeeled sunflower seeds, salted or flavored, can be very high in salt. They may also contain additional ingredients such as added sugar, so reading the labels is important.

Sunflower seeds have a mild taste and go with almost anything. Here are some ways to use sunflower seeds in meals and snacks:

  • Sprinkle peeled sunflower seeds on top of your salad for a crispy boost of fiber, fat, and protein.
  • Make your own sunflower butter by mixing the seeds in your food processor.
  • Add sunflower seeds to oatmeal, yogurt, or chia pudding.
  • Mix together salted sunflower seeds, almonds, cocoa nibs and dried cherries to make a salty and sweet trail mix.
  • Use sunflower seeds in baked goods like muffins and bread.
  • Top grain bowls and pasta dishes with salted sunflower seeds for a unique texture and taste.

As wonderful as sunflower seeds can be for your health, there are a few things to keep in mind when consuming them.

Like all nuts and seeds Sunflower seeds are high in calories. That doesn’t mean they are bad for you, but it is something you should be aware of. Only one ounce contains 163 calories, so a few handfuls of sunflower seeds provide a pretty high amount of calories.

If you are sensitive to salt or have high blood pressure, it is a smart idea to avoid foods high in salt, such as salted sunflower seeds, as foods high in salt can contribute to high blood pressure. Choose unsalted or lightly salted sunflower seeds instead.

Likewise, if you are allergic to sunflower seeds, avoid them. You should also stay away from products that contain sunflower seeds.

Sunflower seeds may be tiny, but they offer some impressive benefits.

They’re packed with fiber, protein, healthy fats, vitamins, and minerals. This means that they can help keep your heart healthy, promote healthy blood sugar levels, and keep you from getting hungry at noon.

Try adding sunflower seeds to your meals and snacks for a tasty nutritional boost.

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