Connect with us

Whole Grains Health

Smart and healthy recipes that can make cooking easier amid pandemic

Published

on

With the pandemic limiting ration and choice, preparing healthy and tasty meals is a huge task every day. That’s why it’s important to cook smart and know the tricks of preparing meals and breakfasts with readily available ingredients.

Slowly treat yourself to something

Who doesn’t feel like a freshly baked chocolate cake or a cheesy pizza? Although Anurudh Khanna, head chef at Westin Gurgaon in New Delhi, is an advocate of healthy eating, he says most people prefer comfort foods to nutritious ones.

“The constant flow of narrative focused on the pandemic has made people fearful,” says Khanna.

“Locked up at home, they seek solace in food and indulge in candy or packaged foods that calm them down for a while only to consume again. This creates a vicious circle. I don’t mind indulging every now and then as food has the power to improve or break your mood, but not every day, ”he says.

It focuses on the careful selection of ingredients and sends an important message about healthy eating, sustainability and best practices. “We can learn to do a lot more because there are few grocery stores. It’s exciting to involve kids in cooking because it’s like a science experiment with dehydration and fermentation to create different things, ”he says.

COVID pushed most of the people into the kitchen for a variety of reasons. You agree with Vijesh Modi, Senior Sous Chef at The Deltin, Daman, that cooking is an integral part of Indian households. “After the outbreak of the pandemic and the WFH, the number of people in every household who wanted to cook or try new dishes suddenly increased in order to save time, reduce anxiety, feel productive or just eat good food”, says Vijesh Modi, Senior Sous Chef in the Deltin, Daman. “Most of them are not aware of the changes they should bring with them.”

Neha Mathur, founder of WhiskAffair, brings the best of the tried and true recipes and helps people discover food and cooking on @whiskaffair (Instagram) and her website (https://www.whiskaffair.com/about-me/). and facebook page. “I often see people indulging in ready-to-eat, high-calorie foods without worrying about their diet, which would do more harm in the long run. Having a cheating day is fine, but it shouldn’t be overdone, ”advises Mathur.

Hard to break

“Breakfast like a king” doesn’t work for many because the routines have made a throw. For many, the most important meal of the day became a quick tea-and-biscuit affair. Chef Modi admits that it has become difficult to keep a set routine these days.

“Most seem to avoid breakfast because of the late dinner and long hours of sleep. Inactivity decreases hunger and boredom and increases sugar and fat cravings. With a WFH model, most people work long hours and don’t have much time to cook. All of this leads to unhealthy snacks. “

Mathur adds that we have become lazy because the routine has disappeared from our lives. “I sometimes feel that there is a lack of planning for meals too. So you struggle with the dilemma of what to cook that is healthy, tasty and fast. Some even skip breakfast and eat lunch straight away, which is wrong. “

Chef Khanna sees breakfast being replaced with tea / coffee and cookies. “Fruits are being replaced by sugary juices or pumpkins. Not only does all of this keep your stomach unfulfilled, but your mind cannot contribute as it should. It is important to note that tea and coffee are drinks to keep you vigilant and not fill you up. “

Have a huge fruity breakfast

Mathur believes in preparing breakfast one day early so that it is tasty, healthy and filling. “On the day when I can’t plan, I look for simple breakfast recipes that come together in less than 30 minutes. With fresh fruits always in season, I also serve a shake for breakfast. Lassi is another fantastic drink that you can make in minutes. You can also try stew recipes that are straightforward. “

Chef Khanna suggests having chopped vegetables ready to make a quick upma or poha. “If you’re not a vegetarian, save some cold cuts to make sandwiches. Make a spread with grated raw vegetables in cottage cheese, seasoned with garlic salt and pepper. It tastes divine on a nicely roasted sourdough and can be easily chilled. Smoothie bowls are a big favorite in summer. The delicious menagerie of frozen fruits, healthy seeds, and nuts is all good health in one bowl. “

Chef Modi recommends a healthy breakfast for high energy levels throughout the day. “Make sure your breakfast has whole grains over refined grains, antioxidants, fruits and vegetables, minimal sweetness, protein, and high fiber. Don’t be afraid of a big breakfast. “Eat healthy and stay healthy.

Food tricks

  • Soak oats or muesli in milk and yogurt with a little honey overnight and take in the morning. Fill it with seasonal fruits and peanut butter or pumpkin seeds, dry and fresh seasonal fruits with a little almond or cashew butter.

  • Familiarize yourself with healthy substitutes or methods.

  • Measuring the food beforehand is better than cooking in large quantities. Store the ration appropriately to avoid wastage and.

  • For garnish, grow herbs around your home for fresh use. Prepare and refrigerate the ingredients used in Indian curries to save preparation time.

  • Use leftover food. Keep them properly for new recipes. That way you won’t have any waste and the ration will last longer.

  • Use the “bought first, used first” method to maximize product shelf life.

Try them out!

Amaranth Bathua duet with turmeric foam

Whole Grains Health

Fun, on-the-go health hacks – The Fort Morgan Times

Published

on

(Family Features) As many people return to their normal routines, they return to their usual on-the-go lifestyle by getting back to work, traveling to new destinations, and enjoying time with loved ones.

Remember, as you go back to discovering and meeting with family and friends, you need fuel for your adventures. According to a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, most Americans don’t get enough whole grains every day and opt for mostly refined grains instead.

Foods like delicious whole grain popcorn offer an easy health hack to make every bite count. Get in the habit of popping 9 cups of popcorn in the morning and dividing it into two containers. Season one container with salt and herbs, the other with a pinch of sugar and cinnamon so you can switch between sweet and salty throughout the day. Bringing delicious options like these along with you on the go will help satisfy your hunger pangs while adding the fiber your body needs.

Because delicious whole grain popcorn is versatile and 3 cups are the equivalent of a serving of whole grain, it’s a simple but tasty option for meeting dietary recommendations. It can be a breeze to add to snacks like Blueberry and Pomegranate Power Bars, Crunchy Popcorn Trail Mix, or Sweet and Savory Curry Popcorn. You can even satisfy children’s cravings with Grab and Go Pizza Popcorn, a six-ingredient recipe that prepares in minutes.

Visit popcorn.org for more nutritious snack ideas.

Sweet and savory curry popcorn

Yield: 8 cups

  • 8 cups of unsalted, unbuttered popcorn
  • 1/3 cup of ghee (clarified butter) or coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons of brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon of honey
  • 1 teaspoon of curry powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cumin
  • 2 teaspoons of sea salt flakes
  1. Put the popcorn in a large mixing bowl.
  2. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt the ghee, brown sugar, honey, curry powder and cumin; stir until dissolved. Bring to a light boil; take it off the stove.
  3. Mix the ghee mixture and salt with the popcorn; Transfer to a serving bowl.

Crunchy popcorn trail mix

Yield: 9 cups

  • 5 cups of popcorn
  • 3 cups whole grain oatmeal
  • 1/3 cup raisins
  • 1/3 cup peanuts or other nuts
  • 1/3 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter or margarine
  • 6 tablespoons of brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  1. In a large, microwaveable bowl, stir together the popcorn, granola, raisins, nuts, and seeds; put aside.
  2. In a small saucepan, heat the butter, brown sugar, and corn syrup to a boil; Cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Pour over the popcorn mixture and stir evenly.
  3. Microwave 3-4 minutes, stirring and scraping bowl after every minute.
  4. Spread on a greased baking sheet; cool. Break into pieces and store in an airtight container.

Blueberry and pomegranate power bars

Yield: 12 bar

  • Non-stick cooking spray
  • 8 cups of popcorn
  • 1 1/2 cups old fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup of dried blueberries
  • 1/2 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 1/2 cup whole natural almonds, toasted and roughly chopped
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 2/3 cup light brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp butter or margarine
  • 6 ounces of bittersweet chocolate, melted
  1. Line 13 x 9 inch pan with foil; Spray with non-stick cooking spray.
  2. In a large bowl, mix the popcorn, oats, blueberries, pomegranate seeds, and almonds together.
  3. In a small saucepan over low heat, cook honey, brown sugar and butter for 2 minutes. Pour over the popcorn mixture and mix thoroughly.
  4. With wet hands, squeeze the mixture firmly into the prepared pan. Chill until firm, about 2 hours. Cut into 12 bars.
  5. Dip the bottom of the bars in melted chocolate. Place on a pan lined with waxed paper; Chill until ready to serve. Store in a tightly closed container in the refrigerator.

Grab yourself and go pizza popcorn

Yield: 6 liters

  • 6 liters of popped popcorn
  • Olive oil cooking spray
  • 1 cup of grated parmesan cheese
  • 2 teaspoons of garlic salt
  • 2 teaspoons of paprika
  • 1 tablespoon of Italian seasoning
  1. Place popcorn in a large, resealable plastic container or 2 1/2 gallon resealable plastic bag.
  2. Spray the popcorn lightly with olive oil cooking spray.
  3. Sprinkle cheese, garlic salt, paprika, and Italian condiments over the popcorn and shake it to distribute it evenly.
  4. Place popcorn in reusable plastic cups to serve.

SOURCE:Popcorn board

Continue Reading

Whole Grains Health

What is gluten? A nutritionist explains everything you need to know

Published

on

Gluten has become a popular topic, and there is a lot of confusion as to whether going gluten-free is a legitimate pursuit or just an unfounded fad. Let’s clear it up. Here’s what gluten is, why it may need to be eliminated from your diet, and the common pitfalls to avoid when opting for gluten-free.

What is gluten

Gluten is a type of protein found naturally in wheat (including spelled, kamut, farro, and bulgur), barley, rye, and triticale. However, as an additive, gluten acts like a binder that holds food together, so you can find it in products that range from salad dressings to vitamins; it can even be in lip balm.

Credit: Wesual Click / Unsplash

Is Gluten Bad For You?

There are legitimate medical conditions that make people intolerant to gluten. The most common is celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in which eating gluten causes damage to the small intestine (more on this below).

Some people believe that gluten is harmful to everyone and should generally be avoided. So far, there isn’t a lot of research to support this. A 2017 study published in the BMJ followed over 100,000 people without celiac disease for 26 years. The researchers found no link between long-term consumption of gluten through food and the risk of heart disease, a concern that people in and outside of the medical community had.

Another study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology in 2019 looked at over 160,000 women without celiac disease. The scientists concluded that dietary gluten intake in adulthood was not linked to a risk of microscopic colitis, also known as inflammation of the colon lining, which was another potential problem.

However, some people may want to avoid gluten even if they don’t have a condition that causes gluten intolerance. As a nutritionist, I agree that a customer can become gluten-free as long as they consume a variety of nutritious whole-food sources of carbohydrates. In short, you don’t need gluten, but you do need a wide range of nutrients and energy-supporting carbohydrates that are easily obtained while avoiding gluten.

Why do people go on a gluten-free diet?

Gluten is found in many foods, so killing it entirely can be a huge obligation, but there are medical conditions that call for strict gluten avoidance. Again, someone with celiac disease must completely cut gluten from their diet. This is because even consuming small amounts of gluten can trigger serious symptoms such as abdominal pain and gas. However, celiac disease isn’t the only condition that warrants a gluten-free diet. Some doctors recommend that people with other autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, psoriasis, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis avoid gluten.

There is also gluten sensitivity without celiac disease. In people with this condition, eating gluten causes bothersome side effects due to an inflammatory reaction. Symptoms can include flu-like feelings, gas and other gastrointestinal problems, mental foggy, and tiredness. The remedy is to avoid gluten.

Another condition, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), is a skin rash that results from eating gluten. While people with celiac disease can also have DH, you can have DH without being diagnosed with celiac disease.

Finally, if you have a wheat allergy, you need to avoid some sources of gluten. Sometimes mistakenly referred to as a gluten allergy, a wheat allergy can lead to a serious reaction to any of the proteins found in wheat, including gluten. Wheat must be avoided if you have a wheat allergy, but you may not need to cut out non-wheat grains that contain gluten. Swelling or itching in the mouth or throat, hives, shortness of breath, gastrointestinal problems and, in severe cases, anaphylaxis are possible symptoms of a wheat allergy.

Even for people without any of these conditions, eliminating gluten can improve health, energy, and weight management – but only if it means replacing highly processed foods that traditionally contain gluten with whole, naturally gluten-free foods. For example, if switching to gluten results in a change, such as replacing a dense bagel of refined white flour with a bowl of oatmeal with fruit and nuts, you may see benefits even if your body isn’t specifically gluten-sensitive.

Are Gluten Free Foods Healthy?

Gluten-free and high-carbohydrate foods, including sweet potatoes and fruits, are nutritious and healthy. (Photo credit: Louis Hansel / Unsplash)

Gluten-free foods can be healthy, but they can also be highly processed and lacking in nutrients. Whole grain gluten-free products like brown rice and quinoa are full of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber, and have research-backed health benefits. Other naturally gluten-free, high-carbohydrate foods such as sweet potatoes and fruit are also nutritious and healthy.

Unfortunately, the gluten-free craze has sparked a boom in highly processed foods made with refined versions of gluten-free grains like white rice. From pizza crusts to cupcakes, you can buy practically anything in a gluten-free version these days. The fact that a product is gluten-free doesn’t automatically make it healthy; it just makes it acceptable to someone who needs or wants to avoid gluten.

In my practice, I’ve seen people gain weight after becoming gluten-free from eating too much processed gluten-free foods like muffins, donuts, crackers, bread, and cookies. If diet is your priority, check out the ingredients list. Unless it’s an occasional treat, a product’s ingredients should read like a recipe you might have made in your own kitchen. And if grains are included (some gluten-free products are made with other starches like potatoes or cassava) they should be whole (like brown or white rice), which means they haven’t been stripped of their fiber and nutrients. In other words, there are packaged gluten-free foods that are healthy, like chickpea noodles, but you need to look beyond “gluten-free” on a package to isolate it.

Beware of the gluten myths

Since going gluten-free became mainstream, I’ve heard a lot of myths about this protein, and I’ve seen some common gluten-free missteps. For example, I’ve met a lot of people who say they’re gluten-free, but in reality they’ve only eliminated wheat-based foods like bread, pasta, and bagels. As mentioned earlier, wheat is just a source of gluten.

Photo credit: Pille R. Priske / Unsplash

Some people also think that gluten is found in all types of grain. In fact, there are several naturally gluten-free grains, including rice, corn, quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, teff, and oats – that is, as long as they have not been contaminated with other gluten-containing grains during processing. (Note: this is why some oatmeal is specifically labeled gluten-free. It is not a different type of oat, and the gluten has not been removed; they simply have not been exposed to gluten.) Also, some people believe that all high-carb foods contain gluten, which results in them eliminating carbohydrate free foods like potatoes or even fruits. The truth is, most whole foods are naturally gluten-free, with the exception of a handful of grains.

Bottom line

Going gluten-free shouldn’t be dismissed as a trend. Some people have to go without gluten in order to feel good. Others may choose to avoid gluten as it helps them make healthier choices, such as snacking on fruits and nuts instead of pretzels. If you choose to go gluten-free, be sure to avoid some of the pitfalls mentioned. And if you need more personal advice on how to meet your nutritional needs on a gluten-free diet or how to treat a chronic condition, contact a registered nutritionist who can advise you individually.

Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, is the nutrition editor for Health, a New York Times best-selling author, and a private performance nutritionist who has advised five professional sports teams.

This story first appeared on www.health.com

Main and Feature Image: Courtesy of Getty Images

© 2021. Health Media Ventures, Inc.. All rights reserved. Licensed by Health.com and published with permission from Health Media Ventures, Inc. Duplication in any language, in whole or in part, without prior written permission is prohibited.

Health and the Health logo are registered trademarks of Health Media Ventures, Inc. Used under license.

Continue Reading

Whole Grains Health

The MedWalk diet: A step closer to walking away from dementia

Published

on

PICTURE: A Mediterranean diet is high in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and fish, while low in saturated fats, red meat, and alcohol. view More

Credit: Unsplash

It has been named the best diet in the world for weight loss, but now researchers at the University of South Australia are confident that the Mediterranean diet – when combined with daily exercise – can also ward off dementia and slow the decline in brain function that is common with old age.

In the world’s first study, starting this week, researchers from the University of South Australia and Swinburne University, along with a consortium of partners *, will examine the health benefits of older people who adhere to a Mediterranean diet while taking daily walks.

Called the MedWalk Study, the two-year, $ 1.8 million NHMRC-funded study will enroll 364 senior Australians – 60 to 90 years of age who live independently in a village and without cognitive impairment – in 28 residential locations in South Australia and Recruit Victoria.

It’s a recent study, especially given Australia’s aging population, where around a quarter of all Australians will be over 65 by 2050.

UniSA lead researcher, Associate Professor Karen Murphy, says combining the nutritional benefits of the Mediterranean diet with the health benefits of exercise intervention could yield significant benefits.

“Dementia is a condition that affects a person’s thinking, behavior, and ability to perform everyday tasks. While it is more common in older Australians, it is not a normal part of aging, ”says Assoc Prof. Murphy.

“Around 472,000 people live with dementia in Australia. It costs the economy more than $ 14 billion each year and is projected to grow to over $ 1 trillion over the next 40 years.

“While there is currently no prevention or cure for dementia, there is a growing consensus that a focus on risk reduction can have positive results. This is where our study starts.

“Early pilots of our MedWalk intervention demonstrated improved memory and thinking in a subset of older participants who followed a combination of a Mediterranean diet and daily walking for six months.

“We are now expanding this study to a broader group of older Australians and using carefully designed behavior modification and maintenance strategies in hopes of significantly reducing the incidence of dementia across Australia.”

A Mediterranean diet is high in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and fish, while low in saturated fats, red meat, and alcohol.

The 24-month study randomly assigns residences to the MedWalk intervention or their usual lifestyle (the control group) so that all participants who live in a facility are in the same group. Changes in diet and walking are supported by organized and regular motivational, diet and exercise units.

Professor Andrew Pipingas, head of neurocognitive aging research at the Center for Human Psychopharmacology in Swinburne and lead investigator, says this study is about preventing dementia from occurring.

“Since finding a cure and treating people in the later stages of the disease is extremely difficult, our focus is on helping people at risk of dementia stay healthy to ensure that Australians do well The future is going well. ”

###

Notes for editors:

  • May is National Month of the Mediterranean Diet
  • The full list of partners involved in this study are: Swinburne University; University of South Australia; Deakin University; La Trobe University; RMIT University; Murdoch University; University of Sheffield Hallam, UK; University of East Anglia, UK; University College Cork, Ireland.

Media contact: Annabel Mansfield T: +61 8 8302 0351 M: +61 417 717 504 E: Annabel.Mansfield@unisa.edu.au

Researcher: UniSA: Associate Professor Karen Murphy T: +61 8 8302 1033 E: Karen.Murphy@unisa.edu.au

Swinburne: Professor Andrew Pipingas T: +61 3 9214 5215 E: apipingas@swin.edu.au

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of press releases sent to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of information via the EurekAlert system.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2017 Zox News Theme. Theme by MVP Themes, powered by WordPress.