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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

What it is, uses, benefits, recipes, and more

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Cassava flour is a great substitute for wheat flour in a variety of recipes. Cassava flour comes from the root vegetable cassava. This is a vegetable that is high in carbohydrates and contains important vitamins and minerals.

To make cassava flour, a person must grate, dry, and grind cassava into a fine powder.

This article explains everything about cassava flour, including its uses and benefits. It also explains how to make or buy it.

Cassava is a root vegetable. It consists of the underground part of the cassava plant.

Cassava is a tuber fruit and has a shape similar to a sweet potato. Cassava grows in many countries and is a staple food for around 800 million people worldwide.

Manufacturers make cassava flour as follows:

  1. They grate the cassava into small pieces.
  2. Next, they dry out the grated cassava.
  3. Finally, they grind the dry, grated cassava until it forms a very fine powder.

Cassava flour is found in a number of recipes. Because cassava flour is gluten-free, people who avoid gluten can use it as a substitute for wheat flour in a variety of recipes.

Find out more about 15 gluten-free meals here.

Cassava flour and tapioca flour both come from the cassava root. However, there are some key differences between the two:

  • The part of the plant they come from: Cassava flour contains the entire root, while tapioca flour only consists of the starchy part of the root.
  • Fiber content: Cassava flour contains more fiber than tapioca flour.
  • Calories: Cassava flour has fewer calories per serving than tapioca flour.
  • Their use in recipes: Both flours work similarly in recipes. However, due to the higher fiber content of cassava flour, it can be more effective as a thickener.
  • Your taste: Cassava flour has a clearer taste – it has a more nuttier taste compared to tastier tapioca flour.

Learn more about tapioca here.

Cassava flour is gluten-free. Many people consider it the most gluten-free alternative to wheat flour in terms of taste and texture.

This makes it a great gluten-free alternative to wheat flour for baking and cooking.

Here are some ways a person can use cassava flour:

  • When baking: To replace wheat flour in a number of recipes including:
    • loaf
    • muffins
    • Cookies
    • cake
    • Brownies
  • In paste: Make pasta dough.
  • Thickening: For thickening a sauce, sauce or cake filling.
  • Crumbs: This is a Brazilian dish that contains toasted cassava flour and is similar to couscous.
  • Flatbread: Cassava flour is great for making flatbreads and tortillas that a person can toast or grill.

Cassava flour absorbs more liquid than wheat flour. Hence, a person may need to use slightly less cassava flour than regular wheat flour in a recipe.

Learn more about substitutes for thickeners like corn starch here.

Cassava flour contains carbohydrates, which are the main source of energy for the body.

Cassava flour also contains resistant starch. These are starches that the small intestine does not digest.

Resistant starches work in a similar way to fiber. They travel from the small intestine to the large intestine, where they begin to ferment.

Resistant starches promote gut health by feeding the beneficial gut bacteria during fermentation.

Eating resistant starches in cassava flour offers a number of potential health benefits, including:

Digestive and intestinal health

Since the resistant starch in cassava flour ferments in the large intestine, it feeds the healthy bacteria there. During this process, the starches turn into short-chain fatty acids.

One of these short-chain fatty acids is butyrate. Butyrate is an important component in the cells of the colon.

Butyrate can also reduce the level of inflammation in the colon. This can help protect a person from a variety of digestive problems such as inflammatory colon cancer and ulcerative colitis.

This means that, in theory, butyrate can also help protect a person from other inflammatory problems in the bowel and colon, including:

However, most of the research on these specific beneficial effects of resistant starches has involved animals, not humans. Further human studies are needed to see if these benefits affect humans.

Insulin sensitivity

A 2012 study showed that resistant starch can increase a person’s insulin sensitivity. Cassava flour is rich in resistant starch.

During the study, men who were overweight or obese ate 15 to 30 grams (g) of resistant starch daily. These men then showed increased insulin sensitivity compared to men who did not eat these resistant starches.

By increasing a person’s insulin sensitivity, resistant starches can play a role in preventing disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

During the study, female participants did not show the same results. More research is needed to determine why.

Find out more about insulin resistance here.

Weight loss

A 2017 study showed that eating resistant starch can help people feel more full. It found that consuming 30g of resistant starch daily for 6 weeks lowered the levels of hormones that cause hunger in healthy obese people.

Resistant starch in food also increased the presence of compounds that help a person feel less hungry in the morning.

Hence, a person may want to add resistant starch to their diet to aid in their weight loss efforts. By increasing the feeling of fullness after a meal and increasing the amount of time they feel full, they may be able to prevent snacking and reduce their daily caloric intake.

Learn 10 science-based tips for weight loss here.

To make cassava flour, a person can:

  1. Harvest and peel the cassava tubers.
  2. Clean the peeled tubers.
  3. Grate the cleaned tubers into small pieces.
  4. Before tying the corners, place the grated cassava in a clean cloth or tea towel.
  5. Hang the cassava for at least 5 hours to allow excess moisture to drain off.
  6. Spread the cassava on a tray until it is no more than a few millimeters thick.
  7. Let the cassava dry for a few days. Alternatively, you can use a dehydrator or place the trays in the oven until the cassava is dry.
  8. Once the cassava is completely dry, grind it to a fine powder and place it in an airtight storage container.

A person can buy cassava flour from a number of places including:

  • the organic food department of larger supermarkets
  • in health food stores
  • at a number of online retailers

Cassava flour is a good gluten-free alternative to wheat flour. It comes from the dried, ground roots of the cassava plant.

Cassava flour contains resistant starches. Eating resistant starches offers a variety of potential health benefits.

These potential health benefits can include improved digestive and gut health, as well as improved insulin sensitivity. Resistant starch in cassava flour can also help with weight loss.

A person can buy cassava flour from the health food department of major supermarkets, health food stores, and a number of online retailers.

Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

From Tahini-Oatmeal & Chocolate Chunk Cookies to Cranberry Tea Cakes: Our Top Eight Vegan Recipes of the Day!

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Ready, set, recipes! Here are our just released freshly made recipes in one convenient place! These are the best vegan recipes of the day, and now a part of the thousands of recipes on ours Food Monster App! Our latest recipes include biscuits and tea cakes. So if you’re looking for something new and tasty, these recipes are for you!

We also strongly recommend that. to download Food Monster App – With over 15,000 delicious recipes, it is the largest meat-free, vegan, plant-based and allergy-friendly recipe source to help you get healthy! And don’t forget to check out our archive of popular trends!

1. Tahini oatmeal & chocolate chunk cookies

Vegan tahini oatmeal & chocolate chunk cookies

Source: Tahini Oatmeal & Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Ooey, gooey, chunky, chewy Tahini-Oatmeal & Chocolate Chunk Cookies by Katia Martin just roll off your tongue. These are the best gluten-free, vegan oatmeal and chocolate chips ever!

2. Cinnamon, oatmeal, and banana bread bars

Vegan cinnamon, oatmeal and banana bread bars

Source: Cinnamon, Oatmeal, and Banana Bread Bars

The perfect breakfast, snack or dessert for your wholesome, plant-based or vegan diet! These cinnamon-oatmeal-banana bread bars by Sarah Ottino are gluten-free, oil-free, soy-free and free of refined sugar. You can even skip the maple syrup or agave nectar when your bananas are ripe enough, especially if you opt for some flavored vegan protein powder.

3. Cranberry tea cake

Vegan cranberry tea cake

Source: Cranberry Tea Cake

These Aaron Calder cranberry tea cakes are incredibly tasty and good for you. Although they take a while from start to finish, you can get on with other things as they go up. Using spelled instead of white flowers increases the fiber and nutrients and cranberries give them a unique flavor instead of the traditional sultana version.

4th. Caramel mocha overnight oats with whipped coffee

Vegan caramel mocha overnight oats with whipped coffee

Source: Caramel Mocha Overnight Oats with Whipped Coffee

Make decadent caramel mocha overnight oats with Shanika Graham-White whipped coffee topped with whipped coffee for an over-the-top breakfast with tons of fiber, protein, and caffeine! The creamy, pudding-like oatmeal is swirled with sweet caramel and dipped in chocolatey mocha cold brew for a breakfast that really wakes you up.

5. Paleo blueberry zucchini muffins

Vegan paleo blueberry zucchini muffins

Source: Paleo Blueberry Zucchini Muffins

These Paleo Blueberry Zucchini Muffins from Kat Condon are grain-free, dairy-free, free of refined sugar and vegan! Full of blueberries and chopped up zucchini, these muffins are soft, fluffy, and perfectly sweet.

6. Chocolate millet cake

Vegan chocolate millet cake

Source: Chocolate Millet Cake

This Namita Tiwari Chocolate Millet Cake is great for so many reasons, mostly because it just tastes so good! It’s definitely a simple on-the-go dessert cake and it’s really tasty.

7. Three-layer vanilla velvet cake

Vegan three-layer vanilla velvet cake

Source: Three Layer Vanilla Velvet Cake

While this Triple Layer Vanilla Velvet Cake by Tori Cooper is definitely a great vacation treat, it’s also a perfect cake for all occasions, from birthdays to anniversaries.

8. Simple cinnamon pecan cookies

Vegan simple cinnamon pecan cookies

Source: Simple Cinnamon Pecan Cookies

These Easy Cinnamon Pecan Cookies from Hayley Canning are tough on the outside and soft on the inside. Who doesn’t love a buttery, gluten-free pecan biscuit.

Learn How To Make Plant-Based Meals At Home!

For those who want to eat more plant-based foods, we strongly recommend downloading the Food Monster app – with over 15,000 delicious recipes. It is the greatest herbal recipe source for reducing your ecological footprint, saving animals and getting healthy! And while you’re at it, we encourage you to find out about the ecological and health benefits of a plant-based diet.

Here are some great resources to get you started:

For more daily published content on animals, earth, life, vegan food, health and recipes, subscribe to the One Green Planet newsletter! Finally, public funding gives us a greater chance of continuing to provide you with quality content. Please remember to support us with a donation!

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

Bringing People Together with Easy to make Russian Comfort Food

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Russia has a long history of droughts and famine. Although there has been no famine since 1947, there have been many food shortages in the former Soviet Union. When the Soviet Union was on the verge of collapse, many common foods were rationed.

There were only rotten vegetables on the shelves, butcher counters offered pathetic remains of bones and fat instead of sausages, chops and roasts. Only last year, Russia stopped exporting its wheat because there were again fears of bottlenecks.

So it might seem like an odd choice when it comes to talking about cuisine, home cooking, and culinary arts. But the advent of the multicooker has made it easier than ever to try new recipes at home, and Russian food has a lot to recommend.

Why Russian Food?

Because it’s comforting, this question is the easiest answer. Russian weather can be harsh at times, and some areas are bitterly cold. If you’re from a country that enjoys a whole spectrum of seasons, you’ll understand that when winter comes, sometimes all you want is a proper comfort meal.

Russian cuisine can deliver dishes that are full of carbohydrates, fill the bellies, and generally satiate and protect from the cold. If you were from England you would probably describe Russian food as a meal that sticks to your ribs.

However, if the English think they eat a lot of potatoes, then comparing them to the Russians, think again. Mashed potatoes are perhaps the ultimate comfort food and are served all over Russia. Okay, maybe not in a pizzeria or McDonald’s. In fact, McD’s made a mashed potato burger, but chose to market it in China rather than Russia.

But the truth is, Russian food can be very satisfying, and while it may not be nutritionally friendly, it can be heartwarming and is often about family and friends. Much Russian food is homemade and shared with families. An interest in Russian culture and history could help bring people together in all walks of life, especially if enjoyed with some pelmeni.

Why are people now more interested in foreign kitchens?

Last year came the Covid pandemic, which is currently still ongoing. This resulted in bans, self-isolation and quarantines, not to mention far more serious consequences. The effects of Covid are still being felt in Europe and around the world. It could take years to return to a real sense of normalcy.

Due to the restrictions put in place, people were unable to visit restaurants and their travel plans were restricted. For many, that meant taking the problem into their own hands and finding a solution. The answer for some was to take up cooking as a hobby and try different recipes.

Cooking at home during the lockdown meant finding a new hobby, making better use of the time, and exploring knowledge of other cultures through the medium of food. The success of one or two kitchen appliances also contributed.

What is a multicooker and can they really help someone cook?

A multicooker is a device with different cooking modes and options. You can possibly sous vide, sauté, bake, and cook rice. You may also have slow cook options that are great for tough cuts of meat. Plus, they can cook quickly to speed up recipes that traditionally take a long time.

Basically, a modern multi-cooker like the Instant Pot or Ninja Foodi is similar to the older type of pressure cooker, but with many more functions. You have helped many amateur chefs try different recipes as the chef does most of the work and the food is ready very quickly.

Combined with Russian home cooking, they can be a great option as the meals can be prepared and prepared with very little effort.

So what is Russian food made of? Is it just a lot of cabbage and potatoes?

Why do Russians eat so many potatoes?

Okay, potatoes are popular, but some of them have practical reasons. When it comes to serving sustainable foods and ingredients, potatoes are among the best.

Every country has its own main carbohydrates when it comes to staple foods. This can be pasta (or noodles), rice, or potatoes. Of course, bread also plays a role, but for the purposes of this article we will consider the first three as they form the basis of many meals around the world.

Between potatoes, rice and pasta, the former is by far the most environmentally friendly option. In addition, in the harsh winters in parts of Russia there is often a lack of fresh vegetables and potatoes are always available.

The favorite dishes of Russians often include dishes with potatoes, but they are exchanged for wheat for the national dish.

What is the national dish of Russia?

Pelmeni is a type of dumpling that is usually stuffed with meat. It can be served in soup, deep-fried, buttered and is very popular. It is sometimes treated a little as a ready-made meal, but it can also make a hearty broth or soup with sour cream.

It would be possible to make pelmeni in the Instant Pot, and there are many recipes for similar dumplings on the internet. But maybe this particular part of Russian culture should be saved for traditional cooking methods.

Multicookers are often associated with healthy cooking, and it can be a shame to take away the pleasure of heavily buttered pelmeni or deep-fried dumplings by trying to turn them into a calorie-friendly option.

Other dishes that have been enjoyed over the centuries include borscht, blintzes, plov, kotleti, and of course, beef stroganoff. There is also solyanka soup, which is both sweet and sour and is considered the best hangover remedy available.

Borscht is very adaptable to the seasons, as it can be eaten cold in warm weather or hot in winter nights.

Easy to prepare Russian dishes

Provided you have access to a multicooker or instant pot, you may be able to prepare some authentic Russian dishes without too much trouble.

Beef Stroganoff has been around since 1800 when it first appeared, and was attributed to Count Stroganoff during this period. Whatever the truth, stroganoff is a meal from Russia that has spread to many other countries.

The problem with this dish is that many countries like the UK and US have adopted it, swapping quality ingredients for practical ones like canned mushroom soup. Fortunately, recipes from Corrie Cooks and other websites have now fixed this, and you can find much better versions.

Making the best beef stroganoff could mean a lot slower cooking, but a pressure cooker means you can get the same results in 20 minutes. To make the best stroganoff, use good ingredients. However, there are two schools of thought here.

Many cooks will advocate using beef tenderloin or rib eye steak for beef stroganoff, but others prefer a long slow cook with a cheaper but tastier piece of meat. When using the Instant Pot for quick results, opt for a good quality cut of beef.

summary

Russian food may not be as popular as Thai, Chinese, or Italian. However, dishes from this country are prepared with love and bring people together.

Is there anything more satisfying than making a delicious stroganoff in just twenty minutes and serving it to a table full of family on a cold winter night?

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

Cassy Joy Garcia offers a way to cook once, get 2 meals

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This cover picture published by Simon & Schuster shows

This cover picture published by Simon & Schuster shows “Cook Once Dinner Fix: Quick and Exciting Ways to Transform Tonight’s Dinner into Tomorrow’s Feast” by Cassy Joy Garcia. (Simon & Schuster via AP)

AP

Some families just love leftovers. What’s easier than reheating and digging up yesterday’s food? But this isn’t Cassy Joy Garcia’s family: they’re not leftover fans.

So Garcia had to get creative on her latest cookbook, which offers busy home cooks a way to reduce stress in the kitchen by turning one meal into two different ones.

She does it by planning two meals that usually share one protein. She cooks meat, fish or poultry for one meal and sets aside something for tomorrow’s dinner that will have its own flavors.

“When we started putting this puzzle together to see what it might look like, I realized we were drawn to something that I already do and use,” she says. “I just never really thought of it as a formula.”

“Cook Once Dinner Fix: Quick and Exciting Ways to Transform Tonight’s Dinner into Tomorrow’s Feast” shows how to switch from a beef and vegetable stew one night to shredded beef tostadas the next. Or dry grated grill brisket on Tuesday and cheesesteak filled peppers on Wednesday.

“I like the idea of ​​being able to bridge the efforts of tonight into a future meal,” she says. “If you get stuck, you have the feeling that you are constantly catching up.”

Each set of twin recipes includes cooking tips and multiple ways to replace a gluten-free, nut-free, grain-free, low-carb, or dairy-free diet. It also includes a dozen pairs of vegetarian meals.

“Her idea of ​​having a head start on making something really big today that will be totally delicious and then turning those leftovers into something else – that’s the real way she cooks,” said her editor, Justin Schwartz , Vice President and Editor-in-Chief at Simon Element, an imprint of Simon & Schuster. “It’s a concept that was true to her heart.”

Garcia’s creativity was in full swing to make sure Meal # 2 didn’t taste like Meal # 1 Chipotle Beef Tacos, the balsamic vinegar worked well with the chillies.

“The biggest challenge was that these taste profiles should be very different, but that commonalities should be found between them,” she says.

In one pair of recipes, Garcia fried a whole chicken in a lemon and garlic mixture for a rustic country dish and then used the breasts to make an Asian-inspired sesame chicken for the second dish.

“You don’t necessarily look at these two dishes and think they can work together. But garlic and lemon are common in Asian dishes. And so I got involved in these threads, ”she says.

Her editor says Garcia didn’t take any short cuts or fell into the lazy trap of just making two similar southern dishes for first and second meals.

“Cassy has such a keen sense for food and flavors. She really brought that to the table, ”said Schwartz.

Garcia is the creative force behind the popular food blog Fed + Fit, which she started in 2011. As a holistic nutritionist, her previous book, Cook Once Eat All Week, was weekend cooking for midweek use. She lives in San Antonio, Texas with her husband and two children.

She is a tinkerer in the kitchen and constantly refines. “I sometimes like to think that my recipe development method is almost literal, throw spaghetti on the wall and see what remains,” she says with a laugh and adds modestly that she identifies with the incomprehensible character of the Swedish chef Muppet.

“Cook Once Dinner Fix” is intended to help families escape the temptation to order and to relieve tension by planning two meals on weekdays around 5 pm: What is for dinner?

“As much as I love to cook, having dinner on the table can feel incredibly awkward and stressful,” says Garcia. “Meal two, it’s ready. It is planned. You know what it will be. “

The global pandemic disrupted the book – it shut down when the poultry recipes were photographed – but Garcia used the time to reconsider her work.

“It has allowed me to look back on the manuscript and see how we can make it even easier for people?”

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