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‘If Not Now, When?’ Yishi’s Founder On Launching The Next Breakout Breakfast Brand

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Yishi, the US’s newest breakfast oatmeal brand, is expecting a national rollout upon signing a deal … [+] Pre-seed round recently.

Yishi

The harsh truth about the $ 21 billion breakfast category isn’t necessarily the lack of innovation, but a growing number of emerging brands reaching out to consumers on the go with portable snacks – the result is that breakfast foods are increasingly becoming Nutrient bars become desserts that are causing stagnant growth in the traditional hot oatmeal sector.

Yishi, a breakfast startup founded by Lin Jiang, an MBA candidate at the University of Chicago, with Asian-inspired ingredients like black sesame, taro, and goji berries, is looking to bring the category back to life as consumers become more at home Pre-cook healthy meals as at home.

The company, recently renamed from Crave Natural, has started taking pre-orders online. The website will officially open in June with five different gluten-free, plant-based flavors: Read Bean Berry, Matcha Latte and Taro Bubble Tea, Roasted Black Sesame and Sweet Osmanthus.

From bootstrapping to starting whole foods

Jiang, who is originally from Qingdao City and moved to the United States alone at the age of 19, recalls how dearly her black sesame was always dear to her heart during her upbringing. “My mother would make it for me when I got home from school,” she said. “The soft, semi-sweet, toasted taste made it one of my favorite foods.”

Frustrated with the lack of tasty and functional oatmeal products while working at Boston Consulting Group, Jiang decided to quit her position that would have sponsored her MBA and start her own business.

Lin Jiang is the co-founder and CEO of Yishi.

Yishi’s co-founder and CEO Lin Jiang kicked off her business with the goal of ultimately reinventing that … [+] Functional food aisle.

Yishi

“If not now when?” She asked – a decision that led her to first formulate recipes in her kitchen and create demos on campus, the university’s Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, and even yoga studios for real customer feedback.

Yishi was quickly gaining prominence in local farmers markets, along with a Kickstart campaign launched last year that exceeded the fundraising goal and got large natural and specialty stores like Whole Foods to stock their products.

Whole Foods became Jiang Yishi’s first brick-and-mortar retail partner, followed by Central Market and 99 Ranch Market, which together account for nearly 140 locations where oatmeal is still available to date, the brand’s soft launch in August 2020.

Julie Blubaugh, the retail chain’s local collector, commented on Whole Foods’ partnership with Yishi and explained how the brand can bring “something new for breakfast” to its customers because of its unique position in the oatmeal sector.

She said, “With more people now working from home and changing their routines, we’ve seen customer demand for more exciting breakfast options.”

Fundraising as an entrepreneur with a migration background

Jiang and her co-founder, Ze Li, who was also from China and had previously launched a working drink in the country, had no connections or families to simplify their initial fundraising process – a major reason that many immigrant entrepreneurs and BIPOC feel prevented from starting a business.

It’s the relationships with fellow CPG entrepreneurs and consultants, angel investors, and early-stage venture funds that Jiang has cultivated on her journey that finally helped Yishi land his first $ 730,000 investment before launch last year .

“I have a strong support system: my co-founder, our incredible team, my mentors from the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago, the Polsky Center, and lifelong friends I made with the Boston Consulting Group,” she said. “You are my family in this country.”

Up-and-coming brand accelerator CompanyFirst, founder of Prairie City Bakery, Bill Skeens, and Dorm Room Fund, a VC firm focused on student-led startups, were among Yishi’s earliest investors. The latter believe the company is well positioned to revolutionize the entire functional food segment. Expansion beyond oatmeal to include neighboring categories such as biscuits and granolas.

Dorm Room Fund investment partner Jason Brooke said, “The challenge today is that consumers who buy cereal-based breakfast products have limited options: healthy but bland oatmeal or savory products that are low in sugar and low in nutrients .

Yishi uses Asian-inspired ingredients like taro to enhance its flavors.

Yishi uses Asian-inspired ingredients like taro to enhance its flavors.

Yishi

“These factors, combined with a hot grain market that is focused on a few players, have limited the perceived need for innovation in the market segment for Bob’s Red Mill, Nature’s Path and Quaker.”

Skeens added, “Oatmeal-based breakfast products in the US have been a sleepy, stable category for many years with only a few big players. You start out with more innovation, but it’s much more traditional. Yishi takes it to a whole new level, not only offering a fresh look, but also a new, Asia-inspired, great-tasting product that will awaken your taste buds and cater to those looking for a better-tasting, great-tasting breakfast alternative for you. “

Expansion of retail and e-commerce

Jiang and her team at Yishi plan to use their funds to increase production, support trade marketing, and expand their presence in retail and e-commerce in the future.

The company has also partnered with the recently launched Asian online food delivery platform Umamicart, where it has become one of the best-received brands according to co-founder and CEO Andrea Xu.

Xu notes that emerging brands like Yishi “are very nimble and in many cases can bring new products to market much faster than larger companies,” which allows them to more efficiently tailor new products to their customers’ needs.

In addition, “traditional Asian breakfast spreads can be somewhat associated with often hot, cooked foods and multi-course meals. [so] Practical offerings like Yishi help our customers learn about Asian flavors, ”she added. “For our customers who grew up with these flavors, Yishi offers a new and delightful way to enjoy them every day.”

Yishi’s ultimate goal is to make its products available in the United States by incorporating them into consumers’ daily self-care and wellness routines. This is expected to be supported by a seed donation campaign from the third quarter of 2021.

“Yí Shì is the Chinese word for” ritual, “a unique name to celebrate our Asian heritage,” said Jiang. “We hope to work with investors who believe in our vision of supporting everyday wellbeing with targeted eating.”

Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

From Tahini-Oatmeal & Chocolate Chunk Cookies to Cranberry Tea Cakes: Our Top Eight Vegan Recipes of the Day!

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Ready, set, recipes! Here are our just released freshly made recipes in one convenient place! These are the best vegan recipes of the day, and now a part of the thousands of recipes on ours Food Monster App! Our latest recipes include biscuits and tea cakes. So if you’re looking for something new and tasty, these recipes are for you!

We also strongly recommend that. to download Food Monster App – With over 15,000 delicious recipes, it is the largest meat-free, vegan, plant-based and allergy-friendly recipe source to help you get healthy! And don’t forget to check out our archive of popular trends!

1. Tahini oatmeal & chocolate chunk cookies

Vegan tahini oatmeal & chocolate chunk cookies

Source: Tahini Oatmeal & Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Ooey, gooey, chunky, chewy Tahini-Oatmeal & Chocolate Chunk Cookies by Katia Martin just roll off your tongue. These are the best gluten-free, vegan oatmeal and chocolate chips ever!

2. Cinnamon, oatmeal, and banana bread bars

Vegan cinnamon, oatmeal and banana bread bars

Source: Cinnamon, Oatmeal, and Banana Bread Bars

The perfect breakfast, snack or dessert for your wholesome, plant-based or vegan diet! These cinnamon-oatmeal-banana bread bars by Sarah Ottino are gluten-free, oil-free, soy-free and free of refined sugar. You can even skip the maple syrup or agave nectar when your bananas are ripe enough, especially if you opt for some flavored vegan protein powder.

3. Cranberry tea cake

Vegan cranberry tea cake

Source: Cranberry Tea Cake

These Aaron Calder cranberry tea cakes are incredibly tasty and good for you. Although they take a while from start to finish, you can get on with other things as they go up. Using spelled instead of white flowers increases the fiber and nutrients and cranberries give them a unique flavor instead of the traditional sultana version.

4th. Caramel mocha overnight oats with whipped coffee

Vegan caramel mocha overnight oats with whipped coffee

Source: Caramel Mocha Overnight Oats with Whipped Coffee

Make decadent caramel mocha overnight oats with Shanika Graham-White whipped coffee topped with whipped coffee for an over-the-top breakfast with tons of fiber, protein, and caffeine! The creamy, pudding-like oatmeal is swirled with sweet caramel and dipped in chocolatey mocha cold brew for a breakfast that really wakes you up.

5. Paleo blueberry zucchini muffins

Vegan paleo blueberry zucchini muffins

Source: Paleo Blueberry Zucchini Muffins

These Paleo Blueberry Zucchini Muffins from Kat Condon are grain-free, dairy-free, free of refined sugar and vegan! Full of blueberries and chopped up zucchini, these muffins are soft, fluffy, and perfectly sweet.

6. Chocolate millet cake

Vegan chocolate millet cake

Source: Chocolate Millet Cake

This Namita Tiwari Chocolate Millet Cake is great for so many reasons, mostly because it just tastes so good! It’s definitely a simple on-the-go dessert cake and it’s really tasty.

7. Three-layer vanilla velvet cake

Vegan three-layer vanilla velvet cake

Source: Three Layer Vanilla Velvet Cake

While this Triple Layer Vanilla Velvet Cake by Tori Cooper is definitely a great vacation treat, it’s also a perfect cake for all occasions, from birthdays to anniversaries.

8. Simple cinnamon pecan cookies

Vegan simple cinnamon pecan cookies

Source: Simple Cinnamon Pecan Cookies

These Easy Cinnamon Pecan Cookies from Hayley Canning are tough on the outside and soft on the inside. Who doesn’t love a buttery, gluten-free pecan biscuit.

Learn How To Make Plant-Based Meals At Home!

For those who want to eat more plant-based foods, we strongly recommend downloading the Food Monster app – with over 15,000 delicious recipes. It is the greatest herbal recipe source for reducing your ecological footprint, saving animals and getting healthy! And while you’re at it, we encourage you to find out about the ecological and health benefits of a plant-based diet.

Here are some great resources to get you started:

For more daily published content on animals, earth, life, vegan food, health and recipes, subscribe to the One Green Planet newsletter! Finally, public funding gives us a greater chance of continuing to provide you with quality content. Please remember to support us with a donation!

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

Bringing People Together with Easy to make Russian Comfort Food

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Russia has a long history of droughts and famine. Although there has been no famine since 1947, there have been many food shortages in the former Soviet Union. When the Soviet Union was on the verge of collapse, many common foods were rationed.

There were only rotten vegetables on the shelves, butcher counters offered pathetic remains of bones and fat instead of sausages, chops and roasts. Only last year, Russia stopped exporting its wheat because there were again fears of bottlenecks.

So it might seem like an odd choice when it comes to talking about cuisine, home cooking, and culinary arts. But the advent of the multicooker has made it easier than ever to try new recipes at home, and Russian food has a lot to recommend.

Why Russian Food?

Because it’s comforting, this question is the easiest answer. Russian weather can be harsh at times, and some areas are bitterly cold. If you’re from a country that enjoys a whole spectrum of seasons, you’ll understand that when winter comes, sometimes all you want is a proper comfort meal.

Russian cuisine can deliver dishes that are full of carbohydrates, fill the bellies, and generally satiate and protect from the cold. If you were from England you would probably describe Russian food as a meal that sticks to your ribs.

However, if the English think they eat a lot of potatoes, then comparing them to the Russians, think again. Mashed potatoes are perhaps the ultimate comfort food and are served all over Russia. Okay, maybe not in a pizzeria or McDonald’s. In fact, McD’s made a mashed potato burger, but chose to market it in China rather than Russia.

But the truth is, Russian food can be very satisfying, and while it may not be nutritionally friendly, it can be heartwarming and is often about family and friends. Much Russian food is homemade and shared with families. An interest in Russian culture and history could help bring people together in all walks of life, especially if enjoyed with some pelmeni.

Why are people now more interested in foreign kitchens?

Last year came the Covid pandemic, which is currently still ongoing. This resulted in bans, self-isolation and quarantines, not to mention far more serious consequences. The effects of Covid are still being felt in Europe and around the world. It could take years to return to a real sense of normalcy.

Due to the restrictions put in place, people were unable to visit restaurants and their travel plans were restricted. For many, that meant taking the problem into their own hands and finding a solution. The answer for some was to take up cooking as a hobby and try different recipes.

Cooking at home during the lockdown meant finding a new hobby, making better use of the time, and exploring knowledge of other cultures through the medium of food. The success of one or two kitchen appliances also contributed.

What is a multicooker and can they really help someone cook?

A multicooker is a device with different cooking modes and options. You can possibly sous vide, sauté, bake, and cook rice. You may also have slow cook options that are great for tough cuts of meat. Plus, they can cook quickly to speed up recipes that traditionally take a long time.

Basically, a modern multi-cooker like the Instant Pot or Ninja Foodi is similar to the older type of pressure cooker, but with many more functions. You have helped many amateur chefs try different recipes as the chef does most of the work and the food is ready very quickly.

Combined with Russian home cooking, they can be a great option as the meals can be prepared and prepared with very little effort.

So what is Russian food made of? Is it just a lot of cabbage and potatoes?

Why do Russians eat so many potatoes?

Okay, potatoes are popular, but some of them have practical reasons. When it comes to serving sustainable foods and ingredients, potatoes are among the best.

Every country has its own main carbohydrates when it comes to staple foods. This can be pasta (or noodles), rice, or potatoes. Of course, bread also plays a role, but for the purposes of this article we will consider the first three as they form the basis of many meals around the world.

Between potatoes, rice and pasta, the former is by far the most environmentally friendly option. In addition, in the harsh winters in parts of Russia there is often a lack of fresh vegetables and potatoes are always available.

The favorite dishes of Russians often include dishes with potatoes, but they are exchanged for wheat for the national dish.

What is the national dish of Russia?

Pelmeni is a type of dumpling that is usually stuffed with meat. It can be served in soup, deep-fried, buttered and is very popular. It is sometimes treated a little as a ready-made meal, but it can also make a hearty broth or soup with sour cream.

It would be possible to make pelmeni in the Instant Pot, and there are many recipes for similar dumplings on the internet. But maybe this particular part of Russian culture should be saved for traditional cooking methods.

Multicookers are often associated with healthy cooking, and it can be a shame to take away the pleasure of heavily buttered pelmeni or deep-fried dumplings by trying to turn them into a calorie-friendly option.

Other dishes that have been enjoyed over the centuries include borscht, blintzes, plov, kotleti, and of course, beef stroganoff. There is also solyanka soup, which is both sweet and sour and is considered the best hangover remedy available.

Borscht is very adaptable to the seasons, as it can be eaten cold in warm weather or hot in winter nights.

Easy to prepare Russian dishes

Provided you have access to a multicooker or instant pot, you may be able to prepare some authentic Russian dishes without too much trouble.

Beef Stroganoff has been around since 1800 when it first appeared, and was attributed to Count Stroganoff during this period. Whatever the truth, stroganoff is a meal from Russia that has spread to many other countries.

The problem with this dish is that many countries like the UK and US have adopted it, swapping quality ingredients for practical ones like canned mushroom soup. Fortunately, recipes from Corrie Cooks and other websites have now fixed this, and you can find much better versions.

Making the best beef stroganoff could mean a lot slower cooking, but a pressure cooker means you can get the same results in 20 minutes. To make the best stroganoff, use good ingredients. However, there are two schools of thought here.

Many cooks will advocate using beef tenderloin or rib eye steak for beef stroganoff, but others prefer a long slow cook with a cheaper but tastier piece of meat. When using the Instant Pot for quick results, opt for a good quality cut of beef.

summary

Russian food may not be as popular as Thai, Chinese, or Italian. However, dishes from this country are prepared with love and bring people together.

Is there anything more satisfying than making a delicious stroganoff in just twenty minutes and serving it to a table full of family on a cold winter night?

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Cassy Joy Garcia offers a way to cook once, get 2 meals

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This cover picture published by Simon & Schuster shows

This cover picture published by Simon & Schuster shows “Cook Once Dinner Fix: Quick and Exciting Ways to Transform Tonight’s Dinner into Tomorrow’s Feast” by Cassy Joy Garcia. (Simon & Schuster via AP)

AP

Some families just love leftovers. What’s easier than reheating and digging up yesterday’s food? But this isn’t Cassy Joy Garcia’s family: they’re not leftover fans.

So Garcia had to get creative on her latest cookbook, which offers busy home cooks a way to reduce stress in the kitchen by turning one meal into two different ones.

She does it by planning two meals that usually share one protein. She cooks meat, fish or poultry for one meal and sets aside something for tomorrow’s dinner that will have its own flavors.

“When we started putting this puzzle together to see what it might look like, I realized we were drawn to something that I already do and use,” she says. “I just never really thought of it as a formula.”

“Cook Once Dinner Fix: Quick and Exciting Ways to Transform Tonight’s Dinner into Tomorrow’s Feast” shows how to switch from a beef and vegetable stew one night to shredded beef tostadas the next. Or dry grated grill brisket on Tuesday and cheesesteak filled peppers on Wednesday.

“I like the idea of ​​being able to bridge the efforts of tonight into a future meal,” she says. “If you get stuck, you have the feeling that you are constantly catching up.”

Each set of twin recipes includes cooking tips and multiple ways to replace a gluten-free, nut-free, grain-free, low-carb, or dairy-free diet. It also includes a dozen pairs of vegetarian meals.

“Her idea of ​​having a head start on making something really big today that will be totally delicious and then turning those leftovers into something else – that’s the real way she cooks,” said her editor, Justin Schwartz , Vice President and Editor-in-Chief at Simon Element, an imprint of Simon & Schuster. “It’s a concept that was true to her heart.”

Garcia’s creativity was in full swing to make sure Meal # 2 didn’t taste like Meal # 1 Chipotle Beef Tacos, the balsamic vinegar worked well with the chillies.

“The biggest challenge was that these taste profiles should be very different, but that commonalities should be found between them,” she says.

In one pair of recipes, Garcia fried a whole chicken in a lemon and garlic mixture for a rustic country dish and then used the breasts to make an Asian-inspired sesame chicken for the second dish.

“You don’t necessarily look at these two dishes and think they can work together. But garlic and lemon are common in Asian dishes. And so I got involved in these threads, ”she says.

Her editor says Garcia didn’t take any short cuts or fell into the lazy trap of just making two similar southern dishes for first and second meals.

“Cassy has such a keen sense for food and flavors. She really brought that to the table, ”said Schwartz.

Garcia is the creative force behind the popular food blog Fed + Fit, which she started in 2011. As a holistic nutritionist, her previous book, Cook Once Eat All Week, was weekend cooking for midweek use. She lives in San Antonio, Texas with her husband and two children.

She is a tinkerer in the kitchen and constantly refines. “I sometimes like to think that my recipe development method is almost literal, throw spaghetti on the wall and see what remains,” she says with a laugh and adds modestly that she identifies with the incomprehensible character of the Swedish chef Muppet.

“Cook Once Dinner Fix” is intended to help families escape the temptation to order and to relieve tension by planning two meals on weekdays around 5 pm: What is for dinner?

“As much as I love to cook, having dinner on the table can feel incredibly awkward and stressful,” says Garcia. “Meal two, it’s ready. It is planned. You know what it will be. “

The global pandemic disrupted the book – it shut down when the poultry recipes were photographed – but Garcia used the time to reconsider her work.

“It has allowed me to look back on the manuscript and see how we can make it even easier for people?”

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