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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

For Taiwanese Americans, There’s No Better Texture Than Q

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The term Q is derived from the word k’iu in the Taiwanese Hokkien dialect for something wavy, curvy and flexible – for example in the form of a grilled squid. Q foods, both savory and sweet, often contain glutinous rice flour, yam flour, potato or corn starch. The texture has been compared to al dente pasta, gummy bears, and marshmallows in western cuisine, but in my opinion, Q is even more limited, with a this and that, here and there quality. Elements that illustrate this texture are known as QQ, which means very Q.

According to A Culinary History of Taipei: Beyond Pork and Ponlai By Steven Crook and Katy Hui-Wen Hung, Q foods are “more substantial than melting in the mouth and [have] a delicious chewability without being gummy. “

It is food that struggles, that absorbs the energy of your bite and returns it to you. Q is nothing more than the smooth, processed American foods that are light and pointless to consume: soft ice cream, huge cups of soda to eat at red lights, or boneless buffalo wings. With Q you pay more attention – not only to prevent suffocation, but also because the enjoyment of it makes you more attentive.

On wet Taipei nights, steaming like the inside of a tea kettle, I chewed chewy balls of sticky rice flour rolled in peanut powder and enjoyed fried fishballs on a stick. Just thinking of Q makes me long for it.

During my summer in Taiwan, Boba tea drinks – with the addictive Q of their tapioca pearls – were not yet widely available but would soon gain popularity before they hit other shores, first in Asian enclaves and later in suburbs. Boba teas have become so popular that recent rumors of bottlenecks due to shipping problems from Asia have led to collective complaints among fans. Those who crave Q should consider the myriad forms available in the Bay Area.

Stir fried rice cakes with mustard greens and pork chips at China Bee in the San Mateo was a favorite at our Love Boat get-togethers. Although we’ve known each other for more than half of our lives, every time we meet it’s like no time has passed at all.

Ba-wan is another popular treat, a gigantic mochi meatball A traditional southern Taiwanese snack: a handful of pork, bamboo shoots and mushrooms, surrounded by a tough, gelatinous shell – often made from rice or tapioca flour, potato and corn starch – and poured over with a hot sauce made from ketchup, rice vinegar and soy sauce.

Cafe Taiwan in the Pleasanton offers a shiny version to take away. While you’re there, get the Hakka dumpling soup, which looks like the frog lady’s eggs The Mandalorian;; Grogu would surely approve of his ooey, chewy goosebumps.

Taiwan cafe in the Milpitas recently started shipping frozen ba-wan, five spice buns, and wan-luan pork hocks (named after a rural eastern community known for its smooth pork knuckles). You can also pick up these and other items at the weekend using an order form Facebook group.

Beef noodle soup is now Taiwan’s national dish – tender shank, tendons with a delicate Q texture, and broth with ginger, star anise, and red chillies. It came after World War II, the creation of former soldiers who became grocery vendors in a time of turmoil. Locals have resisted the nationalist government, which cracked down on political dissidents and imprisoned them. At the same time, an influx of newcomers from all over the Strait to the military villages brought their taste for wheat-based noodles, soup dumplings, and more.

“Eating was one of the first ways to bridge conflict groups on the island,” notes Cathy Erway in her cookbook. The food of Taiwan: recipes from the beautiful island. Here in the Bay Area Liang’s village in Cupertino makes an excellent beef noodle soup with lots of tender but springy tendons. Mumu meals– Founded last year by Bay Area brothers Jeffrey and Daniel Hsu – ships and delivers a frozen adaptation of their mother’s recipe. “We hope that one day this dish will be as well known as Japanese ramen or Vietnamese pho,” says Daniel Hsu.

Q to the max: a black sugar Boba Ice Cream Pop. (Vanessa Hua)

At the end of a meal, I’m a fan of Black sugar boba milk ice cream bars that went viral on Instagram and TikTok with their photogenic, psychedelic swirls. At the end of May last year – the first time I’d ventured into Ranch 99 since the lockdown began – I sped down the aisles, doubly masked, desperately reaching for objects like I was on some sort of game show.

In the freezer, I took two boxes of Tiger Sugar bars – “brave as a tiger,” the motto says – but had no inkling of their popularity until I got to the checkout and found the woman in front of me bought five . (The treat is also available at Tiger sugar, an outpost of the Taiwanese Boba shop that opened last October in Cupertino.)

The bar itself was creamy, flavored with whole milk and not too sweet, despite ribbons of caramel brown sugar and the black boba tender – the epitome of Q – and not the frozen marbles I feared. It was pure enjoyment on a stick. As soon as I finished, I wanted another one; I wish I had bought more boxes.

AAt this early stage in the pandemic, if we choose– –and our reality– –I felt so constrained that certain fads were common on social media: sourdough bread, chickpea stew, and anything else that floated over our feed.

We tried some foods once, but never ate them again. Now that we hesitantly emerge on the other side, my pulse is still quickening for Q.

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

Whole-Grain Pasta With Mushrooms — Recipes for Health

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Pasta makers have made great strides when it comes to whole wheat pasta. On a small scale, Community Grains in Northern California makes excellent pasta using their amazing whole wheat flour, and on a larger commercial scale, companies like Barilla are always selling better products. For this spring mix I used Barilla Penne.

2 pounds of fava beans, peeled

1 pound of asparagus

2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil

1 shallot, chopped

1/2 pound wild mushrooms, quartered or sliced, or creminis, quartered if small, sliced ​​if large

2 cloves of garlic or 1 small onion of green garlic, chopped

Salt to taste

4 large basil leaves, torn into small pieces or cut into strips

3/4 pound whole wheat pasta like penne or fusilli

Freshly grated parmesan for serving

1. Start heating a large saucepan of water while you peel the favas. Fill a bowl with cold water. When the water is boiling, add a generous amount of salt and add the asparagus. Blanch thin stems for 3 minutes, thick stems for 4 to 5 minutes. Pour into cold water, drain and cut into 2.5 cm pieces. Put aside.

2. Bring the water back to the boil and add the favas. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes, depending on the size of the beans. Drain and immediately add to cold water. Let the beans cool for a few minutes, then slide off the skin by pinching the skin eye and squeezing it gently.

3. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a large, heavy pan over medium heat and add the shallot. Cook, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes until translucent, then add the mushrooms. Cook, stirring frequently, until the mushrooms are tender and sweaty, about 3 minutes, then add the garlic. Cook, stirring, until fragrant, 30 seconds to a minute, then add salt and pepper to taste. Continue cooking, stirring, until the mushrooms are tender, fragrant and juicy, another 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in asparagus and favas and remove from heat, but keep warm.

4th Bring the water in the pot back to the boil and add the pasta. Cook al dente using the times on the package as a guide, but check the pasta one minute before the time allotted. When the pasta is done, use a ladle to add 1/2 cup of pasta boiling water to the pan with the vegetables and another 1/2 cup in a bowl if you want to moisten the mixture more. Drain the pasta and mix with the vegetables and basil at the same time. Add more cooking water if you like. Serve hot and serve the parmesan at the table.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings.

Preparation in advance: You can cook the veggies through step 3 several hours before cooking the pasta.

Variation: You can replace the beans with peas.

Nutritional information per serving (4 servings): 531 calories; 10 grams of fat; 1 gram of saturated fat; 2 grams of polyunsaturated fat; 6 grams of monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams of cholesterol; 92 grams of carbohydrates; 21 grams of fiber; 11 milligrams of sodium (does not contain salt to taste); 25 grams of protein

Nutritional information per serving (6 servings): 354 calories; 7 grams of fat; 1 gram of saturated fat; 1 gram of polyunsaturated fat; 4 grams of monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams of cholesterol; 61 grams of carbohydrates; 14 grams of fiber; 7 milligrams of sodium (does not contain salt to taste); 17 grams of protein

Martha Rose Shulman is the author of The Very Best of Recipes for Health.

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

15 recipes and their health benefits

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Making delicious, healthy gluten-free meals is easier than many people think.

People with celiac disease have severe gluten intolerance and must eat gluten-free meals to stay healthy. Other people may have non-celiac gluten sensitivity and find that not eating gluten reduces gas and gas and bloating. Some people choose a gluten-free diet because they believe it is healthier.

Gluten is a substance naturally found in wheat, rye, barley, and most types of pasta and grains. To prepare healthy gluten-free meals, people can use a wide range of substitute ingredients and whole foods, including quinoa, buckwheat, potatoes, gluten-free flour, and gluten-free oats.

In this article, we provide 15 healthy recipes for gluten-free meals. People looking to eat gluten free can use this article to help plan breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Here are five recipe ideas for a healthy gluten-free breakfast to keep a person feeling full by lunch:

1. Greek scrambled eggs

Greek scrambled eggs that contain feta are an easy, high-protein way to start the day. It only takes 10-15 minutes to prepare this dish.

One large hard-boiled egg contains 6.29 grams (g) of protein, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The recommended daily protein value for adults in the United States is around 50 grams per day for someone on a 2,000 calorie diet. People with different daily calorie needs may need more or less protein.

Eating a protein-rich breakfast can make a person feel full longer, which can help prevent them from snacking all day.

Here is a recipe for Greek scrambled eggs.

2. Baby spinach omelette

A baby spinach omelette is another dish that can give people a protein hit in the morning. With the inclusion of spinach in this gluten-free breakfast option, it’s also high in iron.

Iron is critical to a person’s health. Without iron, the body cannot make red blood cells to carry oxygen around the body.

Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron from food. In the morning, squeeze a lemon over a spinach omelette or drink a glass of fresh orange juice with an iron-rich breakfast.

Here is a recipe for a baby spinach omelette.

3. Gluten free banana muffins

Going gluten-free doesn’t mean giving up classic breakfasts. People can make banana muffins gluten-free by using gluten-free flour, which is available at many grocery stores. People can also choose between types of gluten-free flours on-line.

Bananas are a good source of fiber, vitamin C, potassium, and manganese.

Here is a recipe for gluten-free banana muffins.

4. Breakfast tomatoes

Breakfast tomatoes are hollowed out tomatoes that are baked in the oven with eggs.

In addition to being high in protein from the eggs, this gluten-free meal also provides a number of vitamins, including vitamin C.

Tomatoes are rich in fiber and vitamins A, C and K.

Here is a recipe for breakfast tomatoes.

5. Gluten-free overnight oats

Overnight oats are ideal for people who have little time in the morning, as they are prepared the evening before.

Oats are a good source of a fiber called beta-glucans. Research suggests that beta-glucans from oats can lower a person’s cholesterol levels.

The dietary guidelines for Americans recommend up to 28 g of fiber per day for women and up to 34 g for men, depending on age.

Gluten-free oats are available at most grocery stores as well on-line.

Here is a recipe for gluten-free overnight oats.

Here is a selection of delicious gluten-free lunch ideas:

6. Chopped Thai Salad

Those looking for a colorful lunch can try making this chopped Thai salad, which is bright orange, red, and green and is packed with nutritious vegetables.

The main ingredients are carrots, kale, paprika, and edamame beans. Kale is high in iron and protein, which makes it a particularly healthy addition. Edamame beans are one of the richest sources of protein for people on a vegetarian and vegan diet.

Here is a recipe for chopped Thai salad.

7. Herb salad with tuna and white beans

Another healthy and gluten-free salad that is a great option for lunch is herb salad with tuna and white beans.

Tuna is a source of omega-3 fatty acids. Research has shown that omega-3 fatty acid supplements can lower triglyceride levels and improve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Here is a recipe for herb salad with tuna and white beans.

8. Chicken Quinoa Burrito Bowls

Chicken Quinoa Burrito Bowls use quinoa instead of wheat-based grains. Quinoa is a naturally gluten-free grain that is high in protein.

People can substitute tuna for chicken if they are eating fish but not meat, and they can also swap out the vegetables in this recipe for their seasonal favorites.

Here is a recipe for Chicken Quinoa Burrito Bowls.

9. Fully loaded sweet potatoes

Fully loaded sweet potatoes are a hearty and filling gluten-free lunch option.

These vegetables are good sources of fiber and vitamin A.

Here is a recipe for fully loaded sweet potatoes.

10. Gluten free vegan wraps

Gluten-free vegan wraps are quick and easy to prepare.

The recipe below shows how to make the gluten-free tortillas from scratch. To save time, a person can use gluten-free tortillas from a grocery store instead.

People can mix and match their wrap fillings. Healthy options include lettuce leaves with scrambled tofu, vegan chickpea mayonnaise, or “lazy falafel”. Combining lettuce leaves with a source of protein helps balance the nutritional content of this meal.

Here is a recipe for gluten-free vegan wraps.

There are many options when it comes to gluten free dinner. Here are some ideas for gluten-free meals for dinner:

11. Vegan chilli

Vegan chili is a hearty dinner that’s easy to prepare and goes well with quinoa, a gluten-free alternative to gluten-containing grains.

Full of black beans, pinto beans, and tomatoes, vegan chili is high in fiber. Beans are also a great source of protein.

Here is a recipe for vegan chili.

12. Chicken with braised peppers and tomatoes

Chicken with braised peppers and tomatoes is a nutritious gluten-free option for dinner.

This colorful dish contains protein from chicken, vitamin C from tomatoes, and vitamins A and C from red peppers.

Here is a recipe for chicken with braised peppers and tomatoes.

13. Crockpot sweet potato lentils

Crockpot sweet potato lentils are a filling stew stew similar to dhal. The main ingredients are sweet potatoes and red lentils, which in the recipe are cooked with coconut milk.

This gluten-free meal is high in fiber and vitamin A from the sweet potatoes. The red lentils are also rich in protein.

Here is a recipe for crockpot sweet potato lentils.

14. Indian flavored salmon

Indian Seasoned Salmon is a tasty, low-carb, gluten-free dinner option that can be served with any seasonal green vegetable.

Like tuna, salmon is high in omega-3 fatty acids that reduce inflammation.

Here is a recipe for Indian flavored salmon.

15. Winter cabbage salad with apples and pecans

Winter cabbage salad with apples and pecans is a light gluten-free dinner option that is easy to throw together.

Pecans are high in antioxidants that can support heart health. Research shows that a diet high in pecans can reduce heart disease risk factors in people who are overweight or obese.

Here is a recipe for winter cabbage salad with apples and pecans.

People can prepare a wide variety of gluten-free meals by replacing wheat, grains, and pasta with gluten-free alternatives. Eating a nutritious diet can improve a person’s physical and mental health, and it’s easy to prepare gluten-free meals that are high in protein, vitamins, and other essential nutrients.

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

Is rice gluten-free? Nutritional facts and alternatives

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Gluten is a type of protein found in some but not all grains. People with celiac disease need to avoid gluten in their diet. Others can avoid it as a lifestyle.

Gluten is found in barley, wheat, rye, and triticale, a cross between wheat and rye. Gluten helps foods like bread, pasta, and cereal hold their shape by acting as a kind of “glue”.

Not all grains contain gluten, however, and people with celiac disease can eat these grains without any side effects. Is rice one of them? We’ll find out.

What is gluten Learn more about it here.

Share on PinterestAlthough rice is gluten-free, there is often cross-contact with our grains during the harvesting process.

Rice is a grain, but unlike many other grains, it’s gluten-free.

All rice is naturally gluten-free, regardless of whether it is white, brown, black or so-called wild rice.

Even sticky rice is gluten-free, despite the name. The term “sticky” describes the stickiness of the rice. It doesn’t refer to gluten.

Manufacturers use rice instead of wheat in many gluten-free products. However, while all rice is gluten-free in its natural form, that does not mean that all rice and rice products are gluten-free.

If in doubt, check the label on the packaging or contact the manufacturer for more information.

What if a person has celiac disease? Find out here.

Cross contact

Rice can sometimes come into contact with barley, wheat, or rye during the growing, harvesting, or manufacturing process. This is known as cross contact. It is different from cross contamination, which is a common factor in foodborne illnesses.

Cross-contact between rice and gluten can also occur at home. This can happen when people use the same utensils and cooking areas to prepare both gluten-free and gluten-containing foods.

People should be careful about items they find in a kitchen, including:

  • Sieves
  • shared containers
  • Spices

Wheat flour can also remain in the air for many hours, contaminating surfaces, utensils, and uncovered food. Thorough cleaning usually prevents cross contact.

Cross contact can also occur when bakeries sell gluten-free food along with other goods and when people put gluten-free goods in bulk containers in grocery stores.

If a person has celiac disease and cannot confirm the ingredients of a food, it is best not to eat that food.

For people with gluten-related illnesses, avoiding foods containing gluten is the only known way to avoid damage to the intestinal lining and other related symptoms.

Rice-based products

Just because manufacturers advertise a rice-based product as “rice” doesn’t mean it’s gluten-free. Rice-based products often contain spices, sauces, and other ingredients that may contain gluten.

Flavored rice often contains a wheat-based thickener called hydrolyzed wheat protein. It can also contain flavor enhancers like soy sauce, which is usually not gluten-free.

Sometimes a manufacturer uses tamari instead to enhance the flavor. This usually doesn’t contain gluten, but it would be advisable to always read the labels before consuming any food.

People sometimes make rice pilaf with orzo, but that’s not gluten-free.

People with gluten-related diseases should only eat rice-based products that are labeled “gluten-free”. You should avoid products that say “contains wheat” or a label containing gluten-containing ingredients.

People should also avoid grain-based products and items that a manufacturer made using the same equipment as products that contain wheat or gluten. Just because a product is “wheat-free” doesn’t mean it’s gluten-free.

Starchy foods are a significant source of carbohydrates for many people and play an important role in a healthy diet.

A person on a gluten-free diet can gain weight with rice and rice-based products. However, if too much of their diet is focused on white rice, they can miss out on important nutrients.

Cutting out wheat and other whole grains can result in low levels of:

People who eliminate gluten from their diets should plan carefully to ensure they are consuming a range of nutrients. Healthy foods on a gluten-free diet include legumes, fruits, and vegetables.

Arsenic in rice

There are two types of arsenic. The first type, organic arsenic, is relatively non-toxic. However, the second type, called inorganic arsenic, is more toxic.

According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), rice tends to accumulate more arsenic than other food crops. In fact, it is possibly the greatest nutritional source of inorganic arsenic.

Many people ingest very small amounts of arsenic, and arsenic does not often cause symptoms of intoxication. However, long-term consumption of inorganic arsenic can increase the risk of various chronic diseases.

These include:

Since arsenic is toxic to nerve cells, it can affect brain function. In children and adolescents, exposure to arsenic can impair concentration, learning, memory, and social skills.

Arsenic can cause health problems for anyone who consumes significant amounts of rice and rice products on a daily basis. However, going gluten-free doesn’t mean a person needs to eat rice primarily.

People can include many different foods in their diet to ensure they are getting a wide variety of nutrients. This way, you can also avoid the risk of consuming too much of dangerous substances like arsenic.

Rice is mostly made up of carbohydrates with a small amount of protein and almost no fat.

Brown rice

Brown or whole grain rice is a good source of fiber and is high in vitamins and minerals in bran and germ. It can also be a good source of the antioxidants phytic acid, ferulic acid, and lignans.

A quarter cup of uncooked whole grain rice weighing 42 grams (g) can provide approximately:

  • 150 calories (kcal)
  • 32 g of carbohydrates
  • 3 g protein
  • 1 g fiber
  • 1.5 milligrams (mg) iron
  • 100 mg of potassium
  • 2 mg niacin (vitamin B-3)

Eating brown rice and other whole grains can have positive effects on heart health. People think brown rice is a low glycemic index food, and when eaten in moderation, it can help control blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes.

Brown rice can also help regulate bowel function and prevent various types of cancer.

Can People With Diabetes Eat Rice? Find out here.

white rice

Manufacturers grind brown rice to make white rice. This processing removes the bran and the germ of the brown rice, which increases the shelf life.

Some people prefer the texture and taste of white rice. However, grinding removes valuable nutrients like fiber, essential fatty acids, B vitamins, iron and other nutrients.

A quarter cup of uncooked white rice weighing 45 g makes approximately:

  • 155 kcal
  • 35 g of carbohydrates
  • 0.4 mg iron

It doesn’t provide fiber or B vitamins.

White rice, like other processed foods, can cause blood sugar levels to rise. This can make it difficult for people with type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar levels.

Aside from providing basic nutrients and energy, white rice has no real health benefits.

Fortified white rice, on the other hand, contains a variety of nutrients that are added through processing. It can be a healthy option for a person who only likes white rice, even though it contains less fiber than brown rice.

Learn more about how brown rice compares to white rice.

Wild rice

Although it is called rice, wild rice comes from four types of grass. It contains more protein, minerals, and fiber than white rice.

A quarter cup of wild rice weighing 45g can provide:

  • 160 kcal
  • 34 g of carbohydrates
  • 7 g protein
  • 0 g fat
  • 3 g of fiber
  • 0.7 mg iron

Wild rice can have health benefits, including:

  • help protect heart health
  • Support of digestive processes
  • Strengthening the immune system with vitamin C.
  • Reducing the likelihood of certain medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some cancers

Black or purple rice can also have health benefits and can be a change from brown or white rice. Find out more about purple rice here.

Rice isn’t the only source of gluten-free grain.

There are many gluten-free grains, starches, and other foods that people can eat as part of a healthy and balanced diet.

These include:

  • Amaranth
  • arrowroot
  • Beans
  • Buckwheat groats
  • manioc
  • share
  • flax
  • Corn
  • millet
  • Nut flours
  • gluten-free oats
  • potato
  • Andean millet
  • Sorghum
  • soy
  • tapioca
  • teff
  • yucca

Some of these are available in grocery stores, but others are only available in health food stores.

Avoid cereals containing gluten

The following grains and their derivatives contain gluten. People with gluten-related diseases should avoid these special types of grain.

  • barley
  • Brewing yeast
  • status
  • Einkorn wheat
  • emmer
  • farina
  • Spelt
  • graham
  • KAMUT khorasan wheat
  • malt
  • rye
  • semolina
  • Spelt
  • triticale
  • wheat
  • Wheat berries

Wheat starch contains gluten, but some manufacturers remove gluten when processing wheat starch.

According to the FDA, manufacturers are only allowed to use the “gluten-free” label on a food that contains wheat starch if it contains less than 20 ppm gluten.

All forms of brown rice are gluten-free, and some rice-based products are also gluten-free.

The nutritional value of all types of rice depends to some extent on how they are processed. People should check the label to find out what nutrients their rice contains and choose an appropriate option that is rich in vitamins and minerals, as well as carbohydrates.

You should also check the label to make sure the food is gluten free and has not come into contact with foods containing gluten.

Rice can be a healthy option, but anyone on a gluten-free diet should eat a variety of grains and high-fiber carbohydrates instead of just rice. This will help ensure that your diet is balanced in terms of nutrients.

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