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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

News beyond the pandemic — May 14

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The coronavirus pandemic has dominated the headlines and our daily lives for more than a year. Medical News Today has covered this fast-moving, complex story with live updates on the latest news, interviews with experts, and an ongoing investigation into the deep racial differences that COVID-19 has exposed.

However, that hasn’t stopped us from posting hundreds of fascinating stories on a wide variety of other topics.

This week we reconsidered the relationship between carbohydrate consumption and weight gain. The carbohydrate-insulin model may not represent the true complexity of the body’s response to bread, chips, and pasta.

Also on the subject of weight loss, we reported a study that found insufficient evidence that herbal and dietary supplements are effective when a person is trying to lose weight.

This week the latest in our Curiosities of Medical History series came out, this time focusing on the long and sometimes brutal history of therapeutic hypothermia.

We also reported on the possible roles of gut bacteria in dementia and oral bacteria in rheumatoid arthritis, warned against drinking sugary beverages at any age, and examined the latest research on how a strong hallucinogenic compound can help treat severe addiction and neuropsychiatric disorders .

We highlight this research below along with some other recent stories you may have missed amid all the passion of COVID-19.

1. Scientists propose to reconsider the role of carbohydrates in obesity

Our most popular article this week, with over 240,000 page views, was our report on new research suggesting the carbohydrate-insulin explanatory model of obesity may be too simple.

The model says that an increase in insulin levels after consuming a high-carbohydrate meal signals the body to store excess energy as fat and increases a person’s appetite for more food. The new research suggested that insulin also had multiple organ effects between meals and that this should also be considered.

However, proponents of the carbohydrate-insulin model have questioned the validity of this study, and we have expressed these views in our article.

Find out more here.

2. “Insufficient Evidence” That Weight Loss Supplements Work

This weight loss article has also proven popular, with over 70,000 page views since it was published on Tuesday. The focus here was on weight loss supplements, with researchers not finding any evidence of their use.

A large global study of 121 clinical trials with 10,000 participants examined the value of herbal and dietary supplements for weight loss. Despite the demand for such supplements, which support a $ 140 billion market in the U.S. alone, the study found no evidence to justify their continued use.

Also of concern to the researchers was the lack of regulations to control the safety or effectiveness of these products.

Find out more here.

3. Medical History Curiosities: The Controversy Over The Use Of The Common Cold As A Treatment

Next up, we have the latest in our Curiosities of Medical History series by Maria Cohut, Ph.D. This trait examined the long and curious history of therapeutic hypothermia.

The practice of cooling the entire body or parts of it goes back to ancient Egypt, but can also be found in Greek, Roman and early modern medicine – but not always with a view to the health and well-being of the patient.

This article looked at the history of cooling the body to heal it and how variations of the technique continue to be used in the 21st century.

Find out more here.

4. What is the difference between vitamin D2 and D3?

Vitamin D has been mentioned in many MNT articles over the past year, including on COVID-19, gut bacteria, treating acne and frailty in old age, and symptoms of deficiency. This week our editors took a closer look at two different forms of the vitamin: D2 and D3.

In addition to the differences between vitamins D2 and D3, the article looked at their benefits and the few foods that are each high in content. It also provided guidelines on recommended daily allowances based on a person’s age and the important role sunlight plays in vitamin D production.

The article has had over 28,000 page views to date and should continue to prove popular in the future.

Find out more here.

5. Excessive animal husbandry has created a “perfect storm” for pandemics, according to scientists

Emerging infectious diseases represent an “existential threat” to the human species, according to a professor of evolutionary genetics.

In an editorial covered by MNT this week, Prof. Cock Van Oosterhout argued that centuries of intensive breeding, habitat destruction and illegal wildlife trafficking combined created a “perfect storm” for pandemic development.

This article has examined the nature of this threat and the professor’s suggestions for combating it.

Find out more here.

6. Dementia, Parkinson’s: Do intestinal bacteria trigger protein clumping?

This week we also reported new evidence supporting the theory that a history of exposure to antibiotics may play a role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease.

The researchers discovered “bad” bacteria in the intestines of microscopic worms that promote misfolding of proteins and cause toxic clumps in the brain.

Worms harboring colonies of these bacteria lost some of their mobility, but the researchers found that various bacteria produced butyrate, which suppressed this harmful protein clumping.

This article examined how these results can lead to butyrate treatments in humans and the limitations of applying lessons from worm models to more complex organisms.

Find out more here.

7. Do bacteria in the mouth affect the risk of arthritis?

Bacteria can also play a role in your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. This is evident from new research we covered this week.

Scientists found that people with rheumatoid arthritis or early rheumatoid arthritis had higher levels of Prevotella and Veillonella bacteria in their saliva than those who didn’t.

The study highlighted the links between periodontal disease, changes in the oral and intestinal microbiome, and rheumatoid arthritis. The presence of these bacteria in the mouth can trigger an immune response throughout the body that affects the development of rheumatoid arthritis in the joints.

Find out more here.

8. Sugary drinks can double the risk of colon cancer in women under the age of 50

The argument against drinking sugary beverages grows with news that they are linked to early onset colon cancer (EO-CRC) in women. Drinking two or more sugary drinks a day is linked to double the risk of developing this condition. This is evident from new research we conducted this week.

Using data from 95,464 participants, the research team found that each daily serving of sugary beverages (SSB) may be associated with a 16% higher risk of developing EO-CRC in adult women.

This risk doubles again for each additional serving of SSB per day in 13-18 year olds, highlighting the benefits of consuming healthier drinks like water.

Find out more here.

9. What you should know about ibogaine treatment for addiction

Ibogaine is a fascinating compound extracted from a shrub native to western central Africa. People who follow the Bwiti religion use it for healing and ritual purposes, but it is also gaining popularity because it induces vivid hallucinations and a deeply psychedelic state.

Importantly, there are many individual reports of his success in treating severe drug addiction, depression, and some neuropsychiatric disorders.

Our new article examined the evidence and risks associated with using ibogaine in this way. Up to 30 people have died from taking ibogaine, so new uses of this old treatment must be used with caution.

Find out more here.

10. Can Coffee Drink Treat A Hangover?

Finally, we looked at the science behind drinking coffee to help alleviate the effects of a hangover. The article defined what a hangover is and what symptoms a person can expect.

However, when reviewing the evidence of coffee’s positive role in hangovers, our editors found more support for the idea that consuming it could make the situation worse.

Mixing alcohol and caffeine can also lead to additional problems, such as: B. excessive consumption and an increased likelihood of engaging in risky behaviors. There is some research to support the use of other natural substances – including asparagus, ginger, and Korean pear – to relieve hangover symptoms, but coffee is not one of them.

Find out more here.

We hope this week’s Recovery Room offers a taste of the stories we cover at MNT. We’ll be back next week with a new selection.

Coming soon: A preview of the contents of our drafts folder

We release hundreds of new stories and features every month. Here are some upcoming articles that might pique the interest of our readers:

  • Could breathing through the gut offer a new treatment for respiratory failure?
  • Genetically Modified Food: Myths vs. Facts
  • Pink drinks can increase athletic performance

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

Healthy Pasta Recipes Under 300 Calories

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These low-calorie pasta recipes satisfy and prove that pasta can be nutritious.

Credit: luchezar / E + / GettyImages

Zoodles are a healthy pasta alternative – but let’s face it, the name is more fun than eating the dish. Good news: you don’t have to go without good ol ‘pasta to hit your calorie budget.

Contrary to popular belief, pasta can actually be a nutritious, low-calorie meal. The key is keeping the portions in check and pairing your pasta with foods high in protein and fiber.

The next time you find yourself haunted by carbohydrate cravings on a cold night, try one of these healthy pasta recipes that are less than 300 calories.

Do you fancy more healthy recipes? Download the MyPlate app and get simple, tasty meals and snacks tailored to your nutritional goals.

Vegan Alfredo Pasta 300 Calorie Pasta Recipe

This vegan pasta is a great immunity boost dish.

Nothing says cozy like warm, rich Alfredo sauce. And at just 280 calories, this dish is high in healthy, unsaturated fats and proteins, making it a filling choice. It only takes you 35 minutes to prepare the perfect bowl in creamy convenience.

Instead of cream and butter, this vegan alfredo noodle swaps the traditional ingredients for coconut milk, which has some great health benefits. Coconut milk may help promote healthy immune function due to its content of lauric acid, a fatty acid known for its antimicrobial properties, according to a January 2015 article in the Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society.

2. Whole wheat carbonara pasta

Whole Wheat Pasta Carbonara 300 Calorie Pasta Recipe

Swap your standard spaghetti for this whole grain alternative.

This high-protein, 293-calorie dish is easy to prepare in just 35 minutes. For a healthier version of this pasta, the recipe swaps whole milk with skimmed milk, which reduces the saturated fat content of the dish.

Instead of white spaghetti, this recipe calls for high-fiber whole wheat pasta. Whole grains are high in fiber that will help you feel full and satisfied with fewer calories, according to the American Heart Association. Whole grains are also rich in B vitamins, which help carry oxygen in the blood and make new cells.

3. Power pesto pasta salad

Power Pesto Pasta Salad 300 calorie pasta recipe

Try this magnesium-rich dish before bed.

If you’re looking for a low-calorie, carbohydrate-filled dish, this whole grain power pesto pasta salad is for you. With just 131 calories per serving, you can pair this pasta with a lean protein like chicken breast, turkey, or tofu for a complete meal.

This pasta salad is made with spinach, which is high in magnesium and provides about 20 percent of your daily value per half cup, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This mineral is needed for energy production and proper muscle and nerve function. Magnesium also contributes to a good night’s sleep, making this a perfect meal before bed.

Lean lasagna with 300 calorie pasta recipe

This lasagna is low in calories and high in protein.

Credit: Arthur Bovino / LIVESTRONG.com

High in protein, low in fat, and high in fiber, this lasagna pretty much hits it all. While this recipe does require a few ingredients (it’s totally worth it), it only takes around 20 minutes to prepare and gives you the warm, full gut feeling that cold weather demands.

Instead of ground beef, this lasagna uses ground turkey, a leaner, lower-calorie protein alternative. Turkey meat is also high in niacin – also known as vitamin B3 – which, according to the Mayo Clinic, helps keep your nervous system, digestive system, and skin healthy.

Vegetable-Loaded Pasta 300 Calorie Pasta Recipe

This vegetable-laden dish will provide you with the nutrients you need.

Credit: LIVESTRONG.com

At just 267 calories per serving, this recipe is full of veggies and whole wheat pasta. With 12 grams of fiber, this pasta makes for a hearty dinner that will keep you full and cozy after bed.

Zucchini, a key ingredient in this dish, provides some vitamin C, which helps boost immunity and help your body process and store protein, according to the NIH. Combine this pasta with a lean protein for a complete dish.

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

15 Plant-Based, Dairy-Free, High-Calcium Recipes

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Calcium isn’t just for kids, it’s an incredibly essential mineral for adult bodies. In fact, calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body, which should give us an indication of its importance.

You probably already know that it’s essential for building and maintaining strong bones – “99” [percent] The body’s own calcium is found in the bones and teeth – but calcium is also “necessary for maintaining healthy communication between the brain and other parts of the body” and plays an essential role in muscle movement and cardiovascular function.

Other than that, most of us only know the ancient source … dairy products. Given the many drawbacks of consuming milk – from treating dairy cows ethically, to hormones and antibiotics to increase your risk of certain types of cancer, to the fact that most of the population is actually lactose intolerant (which means you won’t get the sugar in milk digest) – it’s time to move on to alternative, healthier options!

Fortunately, there are numerous sources of plant-based, calcium-rich foods that can help alleviate the lack of calcium-containing dairy products such as soy products – tofu, nato, cooked soybeans and tempeh – some legumes, – beans, peas, and lentils – certain nuts and fruits, Seeds – especially tahini – a few ancient grains – think of amaranth and teff, also gluten-free! – Seaweed and a handful of vegetables and leafy greens.

We also strongly recommend that. to download Food Monster App – With over 15,000 delicious recipes, it’s the largest herbal recipe source to help you get healthy! And don’t forget ours Whole foods archive!

1. Curry vegetables with tempeh triangles

Curry vegetables with tempeh triangles / One Green Planet

Together with soybeans and tofu, tempeh is a wonderful source of calcium! You get “about 11” in a 100 gram serving of tempeh [percent] of the RDI. ”This recipe for curry vegetables with tempeh triangles by Kimmy Murphy combines a lot of vegetables with a serving of tempeh.

2. Black belt tofu

Blackstrap Tofu / One Green Planet

Since soy products happen to be one of the best sources of plant-based calcium, it makes sense that tofu gets on the recipe list! Tofu is actually “made with calcium phosphate,” which contains “350 mg per 3.5 ounces (100 grams)”. On the other hand, you also get your money’s worth with molasses! It’s incredibly nutritious and contains 179 mg of calcium, which equates to “18” [percent] des RDI ”in just one tablespoon! This Blackstrap Tofu Recipe by Jean-Philippe Cyr combines two of the best plant-based sources of calcium: Blackstrap molasses and tofu!

3. Creamy tahini and lentil wraps

Creamy Tahini Lentil Wraps / One Green Planet

This recipe for creamy tahini and lentil wraps from Tavi Moore is another double punch with two plant-based sources of calcium: tahini (thanks to those sesame seeds!) And lentils. A cup of lentil provides about 4 percent of your RDI, but mix that with calcium-rich tahini and you have a calcium-rich meal!

4. Cinnamon Almond Cookies

Cinnamon and Almond Cookies / One Green Planet

For a nut, almonds are quite high in calcium, providing “97 mg per 1/4 cup (35 grams), or about 10 [percent] des RDI ”, the recommended daily allowance. This cinnamon and almond biscuit recipe from Julie Zimmer is a fun way to incorporate almonds into a tasty package that’s also filled with anti-inflammatory cinnamon and high fiber oatmeal.

5. Homemade tahini

Homemade Tahini / One Green Planet

Nuts and seeds usually go hand in hand in the nutrition department, and that goes for calcium too. Sesame seeds have the highest content, especially tahini butter, which is made from … you guessed it … sesame seeds! In two tablespoons of tahini, you get 130 mg of calcium, which is “13 percent of the RDI”. This homemade tahini recipe from Julie West is a super easy recipe using sesame seeds!

6. Sweet and spicy bok choy

Sweet and spicy Pak Choy / One Green Planet

Dark leafy vegetables are another source of plant-based calcium. If you want to deviate from the standard spinach and kale mix, how about trying Bok Choy? In half a cup of Bok Choi, you get 84 to 142 mg of calcium, which is between “8 and 14 percent of the RDI”. This sweet and flavorful bok choy recipe from Jordan and Clark Cord is a great, flavorful recipe for the novice bok choy!

7. Chicken fingers

Chicken Fingers / One Green Planet

Another super fun high calcium tofu recipe! This Chicken Fingers recipe from Patrica Ganek uses tofu to create one of the most classic, kid-friendly dishes on the market. If you are a plant based household with kids this may become a staple soon!

8. Tofu Fried Rice

Tofu Fried Rice / One Green Planet

You might be wondering what’s so great about this recipe besides that tofu? It’s the peas! A lot of legumes contain amounts of calcium, but peas are high on the list. One cup of green peas contains over 27 mg of calcium! This Tofu Fried Rice recipe from Agnes Potier-Murphy mixes peas and tofu into a healthy fried rice option that’s great for freezing and enjoying now or later!

9. Chocolate sponge cake

Chocolate sponge cake / One Green Planet

In addition to these sesame seeds, chia seeds are an excellent source of calcium and fiber! In two tablespoons of chia seeds you get about “5-6” [percent] of the RDI. ”Chia seeds are also really the best friend of plant-based bakers, as they do the job of eggs … like in this chocolate sponge cake recipe by Maja Tisma.

10. Amaranth yogurt pop with raspberries

Amaranth yogurt pop with raspberries / One Green Planet

I never thought you’d see a grain on this list, did I? While not all grains contain calcium, there are some – mostly these magical old grains – that actually contain large amounts! Amaranth – which happens to be gluten-free – contains about “12” [percent] of the RDI per cup cooked. ”This amaranth yoghurt pop with raspberries recipe by Petra Vogel is a creative way to incorporate amaranth into your diet while also getting a healthy dose of calcium!

11. Salted caramel and fig cheesecake canapes

Cheesecake with salted caramel and figs / One Green Planet

Figs are an unlikely, but great, fruit-based source of calcium! With this in mind, raw figs offer more calcium than dried figs – “18 mg – or nearly 2”. [percent] of the RDI – per picture. ”This frozen caramel and fig cheesecake recipe from Vicky Coates is a great way to incorporate raw figs into your diet this summer!

12. One-pot potato, spinach, and lentil dal

One-Pot Potato, Spinach and Lentil Dal / One Green Planet

Back to that dark leafy green! A classic, super cheap leafy green that you should always have on hand for extra calcium is spinach. Depending on the type of spinach, you will get different amounts of calcium. Mustard spinach, for example, contains around 300 mg of calcium per raw cup, while New Zealand spinach has around 32 mg per raw cup. Whichever type you like, you’re getting a decent dose of calcium! This One-Pot Potato, Spinach, and Lentil Dal Recipe from Julie Zimmer is an excellent use of spinach and lentils for a calcium-rich meal.

13. Wakame soup

Wakame soup / a green planet

Seaweed is an excellent herbal ingredient to add to your culinary experiments! If you’re looking for an extra dose of calcium, try wakame. It is usually eaten raw and contains “approximately 126 mg or 12” [percent] of the RDI per cup. ”Of course, if you’re new to algae, give Valentina Chiappa’s wakame soup a try, blended with a variety of hearty flavors like sesame oil, ginger, carrot and onion!

14. Teff

Everything Bagel Cracker / One Green Planet

Another ancient grain makes the list of calcium sources! Together with amaranth, teff is gluten-free and a great source of calcium. And just like amaranth, teff offers “12” [percent] of the RDI per cooked cup. “The most common use of teff is the flour form for gluten-free baking, as in this super delicious Everything Bagel Crackers recipe from Quelcy Koger.

15. Flax flour pizza crust

Flax flour pizza crust / One Green Planet

In addition to being a great source of fiber and healthy fat, flaxseed is a plant-based source of calcium. In two tablespoons of flaxseed you get about “5-6” [percent] of the RDI. ”Besides that, it is difficult for our digestive system to break down whole flaxseed. So opt for a ground or ground version like in this recipe for flax flour pizza crust by Christa Clark.

Learn How To Make Plant-Based Meals At Home!

Sushi bowl with tofu in a sesame crust / One Green Planet

It is known to help reduce meat consumption and eat more plant-based foods for chronic inflammation, heart health, mental wellbeing, fitness goals, nutritional needs, allergies, gut health, and more! Milk consumption has also been linked to many health problems including acne, hormonal imbalance, cancer, prostate cancer and has many side effects.

For those of you with a more plant-based diet, we highly recommend downloading the Food Monster app – with over 15,000 delicious recipes, it’s the greatest herbal recipe resource to help reduce your environmental footprint, save animals, and get healthy ! And while you’re at it, we encourage you to find out about the ecological and health benefits of a plant-based diet.

Here are some great resources to get you started:

For more daily published content on animals, earth, life, vegan food, health and recipes, subscribe to the One Green Planet newsletter! Finally, public funding gives us a greater chance of continuing to provide you with quality content. Please remember to support us with a donation!

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Recipes with Whole Wheat Pasta

Summer is a great time to enjoy pasta — make these 4 dishes – Orange County Register

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Entangled in noodles? Not a bad way to spend the summer.

Chilled, room temperature or warm pasta dishes in a bowl can play a big role in warm weather. A mixed green salad could round out the meal if you want. But let’s focus on pasta with great flavor in a large bowl, large platter, or yes, straight out of the pan.

Asian-inspired noodle preparations go well with chilled noodles. A Southeast Asian pesto is a summer staple in my home. The coarse, flavored paste can be used in many ways, deliciously stirred into noodles, but also deliciously spread in rice or on grilled fish. I stir it in chicken broth for a quick Asian soup. Or toss it with cooked green beans, zucchini, or yellow baby Dutch potatoes.

The basis of the pesto are ground peanuts, but fresh chilies, ginger, garlic and fresh herbs also play an important supporting role. One of these herbs is Thai basil (húng quế in Vietnamese), a herb with purple stems with pinkish-purple flowers and green, pointed leaves. The herb has a lovely floral scent that is paired with a flavor profile that is something like licorice with a peppery edge. Thai basil is sold in the product departments of the local Asian markets. Some nurseries sell seedlings, small plants that generally grow well in Southern California.

Italy offers endless variations of summer pasta dishes that are served warm or hot. Some authentic, other Italian-inspired American interpretations. Pasta offers a neutral canvas for endless variations.

Enjoy the pasta delights.

Ground peanuts are the basis of Southeast Asian pesto, but fresh chillies, ginger, garlic and fresh herbs also play an important supporting role. (Photo by Cathy Thomas)

Southeast Asian pesto

Yield: 3 cups

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons plus 1 cup of peanut oil, shared use

2/3 cup of roasted salted peanuts

2 green fresh serrano chillies or jalapeño chillies or red Fresno chillies, pitted, chopped; see cooking notes

1 generous tablespoon of chopped fresh ginger

6 medium-sized garlic cloves, peeled, chopped

2 cups of fresh Thai basil leaves; see cooking notes

1/3 cup fresh mint leaves

1/3 cup coriander

2 teaspoons of salt

1 1/2 teaspoons of sugar

1/4 cup fresh lime juice

Chef’s Notes: If you prefer a hotter sauce, use serrano chillies; Use jalapeños or Fresno red chilies for a milder sauce. I like to use half as much chilli as advertised, then taste and add more when the sauce needs a boost. Thai basil is sold in the vegetable departments of Asian markets. This recipe makes 3 cups of sauce; If you prefer, cut all ingredient dimensions in half to make 1 1/2 cups. Throw in 1 cup of this pesto with 1 pound of cooked Asian noodles and serve hot or at room temperature. Season to taste before serving; add salt if necessary. Store leftover pesto in the refrigerator airtight for up to 3 days. This mixture can be used to flavor broths, salad dressings, rice, and grilled chicken or fish.

PROCEDURE

1. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a medium-sized pan over medium-high heat. Add peanuts and cook for 10 seconds. Remove from heat, stir and let rest for 3 to 5 minutes. The peanuts should be golden brown, but not overcooked, so that they taste burnt (put them on the plate if the nuts turn too brown). Put the nuts and oil in the food processor; process until the peanuts are a coarse paste.

2. Put the chillies, ginger and garlic in the food processor and roughly chop. Add herbs, salt, sugar and lime juice; Crush, if necessary add a little more oil through the filler pipe with the engine running. Add remaining oil and pulse 2 or 3 times to work it in.

Summer Linguine with Tomatoes, Brie and Basil is a dish that cookbook authors Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins first enjoyed in Sardinia. (Photo by Cathy Thomas)

Summer linguine with tomatoes, brie and basil

Many years ago Julee Rosso and the late Sheila Lukins, the authors of The Silver Palate Cookbook, came into my kitchen with me to prepare a favorite dish from their book. They chose this delicious linguine dish, a preparation they had enjoyed in a private home in Sardinia. It was introduced in a chapter in the book called “Summer Noodles”.

Yield: 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

4 large, ripe, unpeeled tomatoes, preferably heirlooms, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, see Cooking Notes

3/4 pound brie cheese, chilled, rind removed, torn into ragged pieces, see cooking notes

1 cup of fresh basil leaves, cut into thin horizontal strips

3 large cloves of garlic, peeled, chopped

3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, plus 1 tablespoon, shared use

2 1/2 teaspoons of coarse salt, shared

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

1 pound of dried linguine; see cooking notes

Optional set: Grated Parmigiano Reggiano

Chef’s Notes: You can use either large tomatoes cut into 1/2-inch cubes or 2 cups of halved cherry tomatoes – or a combination of both. It’s easier to cut off the rind of the brie when it’s cold; Place in the freezer for 10 minutes to make it easier to cut off the rind. I like to use Trader Joe’s linguine spinach and chives.

PROCEDURE

1. In a large bowl, mix the tomatoes, brie, basil, garlic, 3/4 cup oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste. Let rest at room temperature for about 1 to an hour.

2. Bring a large saucepan of water with the remaining 2 teaspoons of salt and 1 tablespoon of oil to a boil. Add the linguine and cook al dente according to the instructions on the packet. Drain well. Add to the tomato mixture while it is still hot. Swirl immediately and swirl enough so that most of the brie can melt and coat the pasta. Serve, strain the pepper mill and grated parmesan as an optional topping.

Source: Adapted from “The Silver Palate Cookbook” by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins (Workman)

Udon noodles can be served cold in a dressing of toasted sesame oil, rice vinegar, peanut butter, soy, dried red chilli flakes, and brown sugar. (Photo by Cathy Thomas)

Cold sesame noodles

Udon noodles can be peppered with sesame seeds and dressed with a quick-cooked sauce made from roasted (Asian) sesame oil, rice vinegar, peanut butter, soy, dried red chilli flakes and brown sugar. The rich sauce hugs a jumble of Japanese udon noodles, flat wheat-based noodles in the form of linguine. Sliced ​​spring onions and blanched snow peas come to the party, along with a garnish of toasted sesame seeds.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

3 tablespoons of soy sauce

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1/2 teaspoon dried paprika flakes or to taste

2 tablespoons of tightly packed brown sugar or granulated sugar or to taste

1/2 cup of creamy peanut butter

1 tablespoon of roasted (Asian) sesame oil

1 teaspoon of chopped fresh ginger

1/2 cup of chicken broth or vegetable broth

1 pound udon (flat Japanese wheat noodles)

Garnish: 4 spring onions with dark green stems, thinly sliced

Salt if necessary

Garnish: Thin cucumber slices

Garnish: 8 to 10 snow peas, briefly blanched in boiling water until tender and crispy, drained

Garnish: 2 tablespoons of toasted sesame seeds

PROCEDURE

1. In a saucepan, mix the soy sauce, vinegar, red pepper flakes, brown sugar, peanut butter, oil, ginger and stock; simmer the mixture, stirring with a whisk, until thickened and smooth, about 3 to 4 minutes; cool down a bit. Bring a large saucepan 2/3 full of water to a boil over high heat. Cook the pasta until al dente, about 3 to 4 minutes.

2. Drain in a colander; Freshen up with cold water. Shake the strainer to remove excess water; Put the pasta in a bowl and mix with the sauce and spring onions. Season to taste and salt if necessary.

3. Serve the noodles at room temperature and garnish with cucumber slices, sugar snap peas and toasted sesame seeds.

Linguine with white mussel sauce can be the star of your summer backyard get-together. (Photo by Nick Koon)

Linguine with white mussel sauce

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

salt

1 pound of dried linguine or spaghetti

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

4 large cloves of garlic, peeled and thinly sliced

3/4 teaspoon dried paprika flakes

3/4 teaspoon dried oregano

1/2 cup of dry white wine

2 (10 ounce each) cans of whole baby clams with their juices, see Cooking Notes

Freshly ground black pepper

2 1/2 tablespoons of unsalted butter

2 teaspoons of chopped or finely grated lemon peel (colored portions only)

1/2 cup chopped Italian parsley, shared use

Optional side dish: lemon wedges, cherry tomatoes, whole steamed mussels, see cooking notes

Chef’s Notes: If you are serving this dish at a party, consider steaming some clams to serve on top of the pasta. After steaming, discard any clams that won’t open.

PROCEDURE

1. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil. Add the pasta and cook according to package instructions until 2 minutes before the cooking time for al dente. Reserve 1/2 cup of pasta cooking water and set aside. Drain the pasta.

2. In the meantime, prepare the sauce. Heat the oil in a large, deep pan over medium heat. Add the garlic, red pepper flakes, and oregano and cook until the garlic is tender and begins to turn a pale golden color, about 1 minute. Add wine; Simmer until reduced by half, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in mussels with their juices; cook until just warmed through, about 2 minutes. Season to taste with black pepper. Try and add salt if necessary. Keep in mind that canned clams can be quite salty.

3. Add cooked, drained pasta, butter and lemon zest; throw. Add half of the reserved pasta water and half of the parsley; throw. Once the butter melts, it should appear sassy. If necessary, add a little more pasta cooking water (this is rarely necessary) and toss. Scatter the rest of the parsley on top and garnish with lemon wedges if you like.

Do you have a question about cooking? Contact Cathy Thomas at cathythomascooks@gmail.com

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